May/June 2011 Issue • Volume 39 • Issue 5

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Announcements

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Call for Papers

Publications

Taking Risks: Feminists, Activism, and Activist Research in the Americas, edited by Julie Shayne. This interdisciplinary collection will foreground the challenges of researching and representing activism in Latin America, the Caribbean, and the diaspora. While providing a theoretically and empirically original case study of a historical or contemporary social justice movement, contributors will be asked to address several topics in their essays: (1) How does a feminist ideology or methodology influence your research agenda and position; (2) what sort of tensions have you encountered in your research; (3) how/have those tensions altered your research agenda, and (4) how have you chosen to navigate those tensions? Proposals should clearly explain your research and how you imagine writing a chapter that both presents your research and the tensions inherent in it in a methodologically and theoretically compelling way. E-mail a proposal of no more than 900 words, a 150-word abstract, and a two-page CV to Julie Shayne at jshayne@u.washington.edu. Deadline: June 13, 2011.

Research in the Sociology of Work: Networks, Employment, and Inequality solicits submissions for the 24th volume in the series. A broad range of research that examines social network connections among and between workers, firms, and subsets of firms are encouraged. Of particular interest are studies that explore the role of networks in generating, sustaining, and ameliorating social inequalities. Submissions may be quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods. Submit an extended abstract to steve_mcdonald@ncsu.edu. Deadline: July 31, 2011. For more information, visit www4.ncsu.edu/~sjmcdona/rsw_volume.html.

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change, a peer-reviewed volume, encourages submissions for volume 34 of the series. This volume will have a thematic focus on nonviolent civil resistance. We encourage submissions on the following topics: variations of nonviolent strategies, the effects of repression on nonviolent movements, reasons for the recent rise of nonviolent revolutions, factors shaping the outcome of nonviolent struggles, and the international diffusion of nonviolent methods. Send submissions to Lester Kurtz at lkurtz@gmu.edu and Sharon Erickson Nepstad at nepstad@unm.edu. Deadline: October 1, 2011. For more information, visit www.emeraldinsight.com/products/books/series.htm?id=0163-786X.

Notions of Family: Intersectional Perspectives. Submissions are invited for an edited volume in the Advance in Gender Research series focused on intersectionality within studies focused on gender and the family. The purpose of this edited volume is to draw attention to the way in which intersectional analyses have been used to articulate gendered experiences of family and to understand the ways in which the institution of family has been, and remains, deeply gendered. We seek original manuscripts that pursue meaningful inquiries emphasizing intersectional analyses of the family in studies of courtship, marriage, intimacy, sexuality, parenting, child-rearing, etc., as each relate to the institution and experiences of the family. We also seek manuscripts that explore this dynamic from the perspectives of social policy and law. Despite the long tradition of scholarly research using this framework of analysis, questions remain regarding how we operationalize race, class, gender, etc. to do research that speaks to our social identities and lived experiences. We seek original research submissions utilizing either, or both, quantitative and qualitative methods of analyses. Abstracts deadline: May 20, 2011. Contact: Marla Kohlman at kohlmanm@kenyon.edu. Identify submissions with keywords Gender and Family Intersections.

The Rutgers Journal of Sociology (RJS): Emerging Areas in Sociological Inquiry provides a forum for graduate students and junior scholars to present well-researched and theoretically compelling review articles on an annual topic in sociology. Each volume features comprehensive commentary on emerging areas of sociological interest. These are critical evaluations of current research synthesized into cohesive articles about the state of the art in the discipline. Works that highlight the cutting-edge of the field, in terms of theoretical, methodological, or topical areas, are privileged. RJS invites submissions for its second annual edition, which will focus on Knowledge in Contention. We accept original reviews of relevant research, but not empirical research papers. Reviews must not be under review or elsewhere published at the time of submission and should be no more than 10,000 words, including references, notes, tables, figures, acknowledgements and cover pages. Deadline: September 15, 2011. For more information, visit sociology.rutgers.edu/RJS.html.

The International Review of Sociology (IRS) is a channel to spread up-to-date results of interdisciplinary research and analysis across continents and cultures. It is published three times a year in English, French, German, and Spanish, and is subject to the peer-review process. IRS welcomes scientific articles, research results, and self-candidature as guest-editors of the monographic section of the IRS. Contact: Giovanni B. Sgritta, Sapienza Università di Roma, Editor, International Review of Sociology; +39-06-49910645; sgritta@uniroma1.it.

Meetings

2011 Annual Meeting of the Southern Demographic Association, October 19-21, 2011, Doubletree Hotel, Tallahassee, FL. Abstracts for posters and papers are invited as well as suggestions of topics for panels and poster sessions. Presentations of research in both applied and academic sociology are welcome as are related topics in sociology, political science, public health, epidemiology, and psychology. The structure of presentations is flexible; potential contributors are encouraged to not only send abstracts for individual research papers, but also for posters, complete sessions, thematic sessions, panel discussions, software demonstrations and more. Deadline: June 15, 2011. Contact: Bob Freymeyer at rhfreym@presby.edu. For more information, visit sda-demography.org/.

2011 Summer Meeting of the Research Committee on Social Stratification and Mobility of the International Sociological Association (RC28), August 8-12, 2011, Iowa City, IA. Theme: "Opportunity, Meritocracy, and Changing Patterns of Social Inequality." We are interested in all topics relevant to social stratification and mobility. In addition to regular paper sessions, we plan to host a poster session. We seek papers that address the connections between social stratification and demography. The best of these papers will be peer reviewed for possible publication in a special issue of Population Review. Paper and poster submissions should consist of an abstract of 300 words maximum. Deadline: June 15, 2011. Contact: RC28-Abstracts@uiowa.edu

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Meetings

August 8-12 2011. 2011 Summer Meeting of the Research Committee on Social Stratification and Mobility of the International Sociological Association (RC28), Iowa City, IA. Theme: "Opportunity, Meritocracy, and Changing Patterns of Social Inequality." Contact: RC28-Abstracts@uiowa.edu.

October 19-21, 2011. 2011 Annual Meeting of the Southern Demographic Association, Doubletree Hotel, Tallahassee, FL. Contact: Bob Freymeyer at rhfreym@presby.edu. For more information, visit sda-demography.org/.

November 29-December 1, 2011. 2011 TASA Conference, University of Newcastle. Theme: "Local Lives/Global Networks." For more information, visit www.tasa.org.au/tasa-conference/2011-tasa-conference/.

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Funding

Peter F. McManus Charitable Trust offers research grants to non-profit organizations for research into the causes of alcoholism or substance abuse. Basic, clinical, and social-environmental proposals will all be considered. The Trust expects to grant approximately $150,000 this year and will consider requests for up to $50,000. Send a brief summary proposal (2-3 pages) and proposed budget along with a copy of the institution’s (501)(c)(3) letter and investigator’s bio-sketch. No more than 10% of amount granted may be used for indirect costs. Deadline: August 31, 2011. Send application materials to Katharine G. Lidz, 31 Independence Court, Wayne, PA 19087; (610) 647-4974; fax (610) 647-8316.

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Competitions

The Pacific Association of Public Opinion Research (PAPOR) invites submissions to its annual Student Paper Competition. Topics sought include: substantive findings about public opinion, statistical techniques, methodological issues, new technologies or methodologies, or theoretical issues in the formation, change or measurement of public opinion. Entries may be from any field that employs survey and opinion research. Eligible papers will be authored by graduate or undergraduate students, currently attending colleges and universities in PAPOR’s geographic region. First- and second-place winners receive a cash award, travel expenses to the annual conference in San Francisco, and other recognitions. Maximum 30 pages. Deadline: October 15, 2011. Contact: Kelly Patterson at studentpaper@papor.org. For more information, visit www.papor.org.

Southern Demographic Association (SDA) Awards. Everett S. Lee Outstanding Graduate Student Paper Award sdademography.org/sda_lee_award.php and the award for the outstanding undergraduate paper sdademography.org/sda_undergrad_award.php. The Walt Terrie Award is given to recognize the best paper presented at the SDA Annual Meeting on an applied topic, especially one relating to state and local demography sda-demography.org/.

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In the News

The American Sociological Association was mentioned in a March 21 Inside Higher Ed article, "Sociologists Blast Doctoral Rankings" and in the April 18 article, "‘Substantive’ Errors in Grad Rankings."

An American Sociological Review study was mentioned in a March 14 Pittsburgh Tribune-Review article about how fewer school construction projects are being awarded to minority contractors. An American Sociological Review study was also mentioned on NPR’s "Tell Me More" on April 7 during an interview with NAACP head Benjamin Jealous.

Elijah Anderson, Yale University, was interviewed on NPR’s "Talk of the Nation" on April 4 and was the subject of an NPR.com article about bridging racial divides in "Cosmopolitan Canopies."

Kevin Anderson, University of California-Santa Barbara, was interviewed on April 22 on KPFK-FM (Pacifica), Los Angeles’ "Beneath the Surface" with Suzi Weissman about his book Marx at the Margins and on the Arab Spring.

Peter Bearman, Columbia University, and Marissa King, Yale University, were quoted in an April 6 U.S. News and World Report article about their American Sociological Review study, which found that socioeconomics is playing a reduced role in autism diagnoses. The study was also the subject of articles in a number of other media outlets including Yahoo!News, UPI.com, and Bloomberg Businessweek on April 6.

Andrew A. Beveridge, Queens College, City University of New York, William H. Frey, Brookings Institution, and John R. Logan, Brown University, were quoted in a March 28 New York Times article about how non-Hispanic whites are now a minority in the 23-county New York region.

William T. Bielby, University of Illinois-Chicago, and Laura Beth Nielsen, Northwestern University, were quoted and the American Sociological Association was mentioned in a March 28 New York Times article about an employment discrimination suit against Wal-Mart. Bielby was also mentioned in March 29 Chicago Sun-Times and Slate.com articles related to the case.

David Blouin, Indiana University-South Bend, and Elizabeth Terrien, University of Chicago, were quoted in a March 15 New York Times article about human-pet relationships.

Casey Borch, University of Alabama-Birmingham, and Thomas R. Hochschild Jr., Valdosta State University, were mentioned in an April 17 Boston Globe article about their study, "About Face: The Association Between Facial Appearance and Status Attainment among Military Personnel."

Andrea Borella, University of Turin-Italy, was quoted in a February 12 La Repubblica article about his doctoral research on the Amish. He was also interviewed on March 19 on Rai 2’s television program TG2-Storie about his book and research on the Amish of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

Mariko Chang, Harvard University, wrote an April 10 Washington Post op-ed on "Five Myths About Why Women Earn Less than Men."

Mounira M. Charrad, University of Texas-Austin, was interviewed on March 18 by BBC World Service, African News and Current Affairs, about the dynamics and possible consequences of the Tunisian Revolution of January 2011.

Mark Chaves, Duke University, and Paul Froese, Baylor University, were quoted in an April 2 Huffington Post article about whether religion in America is in decline.

Marie Cornwall, Brigham Young University, was quoted in an April 21 USA Today article, "Mormon Guys Delay Marriage in Paralyzing Hunt for Perfect Wife."

Yanyi Djamba, Auburn University-Montgomery, was mentioned in a March 23 Montgomery Advertiser editorial about Alabama’s aging population, wrote an April 12 Montgomery Advertiser op-ed about the Census and redistricting in Alabama, and was quoted in a March 28 Montgomery Advertiser article about how Alabama’s population growth causes concern for the future. The Associated Press picked up the article, and it subsequently appeared in media outlets including USA Today, the San Antonio Express-News, and the Anniston Star.

Teresa Downing-Matibag, Iowa State University, Paula England, Stanford University, and Mark Regnerus, University of Texas-Austin, were quoted and Wendy Brynildsen, Duke University, was mentioned in a March 30 USA Today article, "More College ‘Hookups,’ but More Virgins, Too." The USA Today article, Downing-Matibag, and England were also referenced in a March 31 post on NPR’s "The Two-Way" blog.

Peter Dreier, Occidental College, wrote a March 31 column for the Huffington Post, "Battle Over Censorship of Maine Murals Part of a Larger Struggle for Basic Rights and Justice."

Patricia Drentea, University of Alabama-Birmingham, was interviewed on BBC Radio 4’s "Thinking Allowed" on March 2 about her research on the concept "ethical capital."

Laurie Essig, Middlebury College, authored a March 28 post on The Chronicle of Higher Education’s "Brainstorm" blog about "right-wing intimidation" of the sort she says University of Wisconsin history professor and incoming president of the American Historical Association William Cronon is facing.

Amitai Etzioni, George Washington University, wrote an April 13 column for CNN.com criticizing U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan’s plan to address the deficit.

Claude Fischer, University of California-Berkeley, was quoted in a March 20 New York Times article about the decrease in telephone calls.

William H. Frey, Brookings Institution, and Matthew Snipp, Stanford University, were quoted in a March 20 New York Times article, "Black and White Married in the Deep South: A Shifting Image."

Charles Gallagher, La Salle University, Robert Putnam, Harvard University, and Matt Wray, Temple University, were quoted in a March 4 CNN.com article about white racial anxiety.

Duane Gill, Oklahoma State University, and J. Steven Picou, University of South Alabama, were mentioned in an April 20 Time.com article, "The Biggest Casualty of the Oil Spill: Mental Health."

Ho-fung Hung, Indiana University-Bloomington, was mentioned in an April 11 Wall Street Journal article about the recent wave of protests in Hong Kong and his article on China’s export-oriented developmental model was cited in an April New Internationalist magazine story about Chinese workers and the Chinese economic miracle.

Carole Joffe, University of California-San Francisco, was quoted in an April 15 Washington Post column about abortion, Planned Parenthood, and the threatened government shutdown.

Antwan Jones, George Washington University, and Ronald Mize, Cornell University, were quoted and Alicia Swords, Ithaca College, was mentioned in an April 10 Times Daily article centered around Census data, which showed that Franklin County has the highest proportion of Hispanic residents of any county in Alabama.

Philip Kasinitz and Peter Kwong, Graduate Center, City University of New York, were quoted in a March 20 New York Times article about ethnic niches in business.

Erin L. Kelly, University of Minnesota, was quoted and Phyllis Moen, University of Minnesota, was mentioned in an April 6 Star Tribune article about their American Sociological Review study, which found that flexible schedules and results-oriented workplaces reduce work-family conflict and turnover. The study, co-authored with Eric Tranby, University of Delaware, was all the subject of articles in a number of media outlets including Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal on April 6, Yahoo!News (India) on April 7, and the New York Post on April 10.

Stephen Klineberg, Rice University, was quoted in an April 21 Houston Chronicle article, "Survey Stresses How Education Will Shape Houston’s Future."

D. Michael Lindsay, Rice University, was quoted in a March 29 Boston Globe article about how he was chosen to become president of Gordon College in Wenham, Massachusetts.

Aaron McCright, Michigan State University, was quoted in an April 19 UPI.com article about his study, which found that Americans have become increasingly polarized on the global warming issue. The study was also the subject of an April 19 post on The Hill’s "E² Wire" blog.

Melissa A. Milkie, University of Maryland-College Park, was quoted in a March 9 U.S. News and World Report article about her Journal of Health and Social Behavior study, which found that a negative classroom environment adversely affects children’s mental health. The study, co-authored with Catharine Warner, University of Maryland, was also the subject of articles in outlets including Yahoo!News, UPI.com, and Education Week on March 9.

Alondra Nelson, Columbia University, was quoted in a February 20 Guardian (London) article about representations of black women in popular culture.

J. Steven Picou, University of South Alabama, was quoted in a March 19 New York Times article about issues of disaster recovery faced by survivors of the recent Japanese earthquake and tsunami.

Anthony J. Pogorelc, The Catholic University of America, was quoted in an April 2 Tablet article in which he discussed the effects of the growing population of Latinos in the Catholic Church in the United States. He was also interviewed and took questions from the radio audience of Relevant Radio’s "The Drew Mariani Show" on April 4 about the consequences of the Florida minister’s burning of a Quran.

Harriet Presser, University of Maryland, was quoted in an April 18 post on the New York Times "Motherlode" blog about women working at night.

Fabio Rojas, Indiana University-Bloomington, was mentioned in an April 13 ABC.com column, which explores whether ware protestors have been betrayed by President Obama.

Jake Rosenfeld, University of Washington, was mentioned and Bruce Western, Harvard University, was quoted in a March 21 Miller-McCune article, "Unions, Wages and the ‘Moral Economy.’"

Ruben Rumbaut, University of California-Irvine, was interviewed on NPR’s "All Things Considered" on March 30 about rational and ethnic designations in the 2010 Census.

Markus H. Schafer, Purdue University, was quoted in a March 3 CNN.com article about his Social Psychology Quarterly study, which found that the discrimination obese people feel may have a direct impact on their physical health. The study, which Schafer co-authored with Kenneth Ferraro, Purdue University, was also the subject of articles in a number of other media outlets including Bloomberg Businessweek and UPI.com on March 3, and the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Tribune, Yahoo!News, and MSNBC.com on March 4.

Scott Schieman, University of Toronto, was quoted in a March 8 Globe and Mail article about his Journal of Health and Social Behavior study, which found that receiving work-related communication at home takes a greater toll on women. The study, which Schieman co-authored with Paul Glavin and Sarah Reid, University of Toronto, was also the subject of articles in a number of other media outlets including the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post’s "The Checkup" blog, Time.com, and Reuters.com on March 9, USA Today on March 10, and the Wall Street Journal’s "The Juggle" blog on April 13.

Eran Shor, McGill University, was quoted in an April 4 UPI.com article about his study, which found that unemployment increases the risk of premature death. The study was also mentioned in a number of other media outlets including the Daily Mail and the Times of India on April 5 and NBCNewYork.com and the Toronto Sun on April 6.

Gregory D. Squires, George Washington University, wrote a March 28 column for Huffington Post, "Contexts: The More Challenging and Troubling Missing Pieces of the Financial Reform Debate." The column mentions a recent American Sociological Review study by Bruce Western, Princeton University.

Marta Tienda, Princeton University, was interviewed on March 31 on NPRís "All Things Considered" about racial and ethnic designations in the U.S. Census, interracial marriage, and related immigration issues.

Duncan Watts, Yahoo!Research, was the subject of a March 29 Scientific American Q&A centered around his new book, Everything Is Obvious*: *Once You Know the Answer.

Ronald Weitzer, George Washington University, was quoted in an April 8 Newsday column about legalizing prostitution. The column also appeared in the Boston Herald on April 14.

Bradley Wright, University of Connecticut, was quoted in a March 19 Washington Post article, "Can Being Christian Save Your Marriage?"

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Awards

Rodney F. Ganey, Press Ganey Associates, was honored with a 2011 Distinguished Alumni Award from Iowa State University, which honors ISU alumni who are nationally recognized for preeminent contributions to their professions or life’s work.

Shaul Kelner, Vanderbilt University, received the Association for Jewish Studies’ 2010 Jordan Schnizter Book Award in Social Science, Anthropology and Folklore for his book Tours That Bind: Diaspora, Pilgrimage and Israeli Birthright Tourism.

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Transitions

Ester Chow, American University, has announced her retirement. Chow will continue to mentor doctoral candidates and publish.

Davita Silfen Glasberg has been appointed Associate Dean of Social Sciences in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences of the University of Connecticut.

Salvador Vidal-Ortiz was granted tenure and promoted to associate professor in the Department of Sociology at American University this spring while completing his Fulbright award on research with displaced LGBT people in Bogotá, Colombia.

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People

William F. Danaher, College of Charleston, has been elected Vice President-elect of the Southern Sociological Society.

Tyrone Forman, Emory University, has been selected as a Fellow at The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University during the 2011-2012 academic year.

Kathleen Gerson, New York University, has been selected as a Fellow at The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University during the 2011-2012 academic years.

Michael Hechter, Arizona State University, has been selected as a Fellow at The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University during the 2011-2012 academic year.

Michael Macy, Cornell Univerity, has been selected as a Fellow at The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University during the 2011-2012 academic year.

Scott Melzer, Albion College, appeared in the HBO documentary, Gun Fight, which premiered on April 13. Melzer discussed the National Rifle Association in the context of gun politics and culture wars.

Dina Okamoto, University of California-Davis, has been selected as a Fellow at The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University during the 2011-2012 academic year.

William Roy, University of California-Los Angeles, has been selected as a Fellow at The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University during the 2011-2012 academic year.

Donald Tomaskovic-Devey, University of Massachusetts, has been elected President-elect of the Southern Sociological Society.

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New Books

Berch Berberoglu, University of Nevada-Reno, Globalization in the 21st Century: Labor, Capital, and the State on a World Scale (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010).

Dana M. Britton, Kansas State University, The Gender of Crime (Rowman & Littlefield, 2011).

Wade M. Cole, University of Utah, Uncommon Schools: The Global Rise of Postsecondary Institutions for Indigenous Peoples (Stanford University Press, 2011).

Elena Ermolaeva and Jessica Ross, both of Marshall University, Unintended Consequences of Human Actions (University Press of America, 2011).

Nina Eliasoph, University of Southern California, Making Volunteers: Civic Life after Welfare’s End (Princeton University Press, 2011).

Christian Fleck, A Transatlantic History of the Social Sciences: Robber Barons, the Third Reich and the Invention of Empirical Social Research (Bloomsbury Academic, 2011).

Christian Fleck and Nico Stehr, Eds., Paul F. Lazarsfeld: An Empirical Theory of Social Action - Collected Writings (Bardwell Press, 2011).

Anton K. Jacobs, Kansas City Art Institute, Religion and the Critical Mind: A Journey for Seekers, Doubters and the Curious (Rowman & Littlefield, 2010).

Cardell K. Jacobson, Brigham Young University, and Lara Burton, Eds., Modern Polygamy in the United States: Historical, Cultural, and Legal Issues (Oxford University Press, 2011).

Olaf F. Larson, University of Wisconsin, When Horses Pulled the Plow: Life of a Wisconsin Farm Boy, 1910–1929 (University of Wisconsin Press, 2011).

Jonathan Markovitz, University of California-San Francisco, Racial Spectacles: Explorations in Media, Race, and Justice (Routledge, 2011).

Cecilia Menjívar, Arizona State University, Enduring Violence: Latina Women’s Lives in Guatemala (University of California Press, 2011).

Philip R. Newman and Barbara M. Newman, both of the University of Rhode Island, Development Through Life: A Psychosocial Approach, 11th ed. (Cengage/Wadsworth, 2011).

Thomas F. Pettigrew, University of California-Santa Cruz, and Linda R. Tropp, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, When Groups Meet: The Dynamics of Intergroup Contact (Psychology Press, 2011).

Richard Quinney, Northern Illinois University, Once Upon an Island: Photographs of New York City and the Construction of the World Trade Center (Borderland Books/University of Wisconsin Press, 2011).

Joel Nathan Rosen, Moravian College, From New Lanark to Mound Bayou: Owenism in the Mississippi Delta (Carolina Academic Press, 2011).

Mark L. Goldstein and Stephen J. Morewitz, Chronic Disorders in Children and Adolescents (Springer, 2011).

Yvonne Zylan , Hamilton College, States of Passion: Law, Identity, and Social Construction of Desire (Oxford University Press, 2011).

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Other Organizations

International Conferences on Public Policy and Management. The Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) and the University of Maryland School of Public Policy invite proposals to host one of three independent international public policy and management conferences in calendar years 2012, 2013, and 2014. The conferences could focus on a specific topic in public policy and management, or span multiple topics. Relevance to current issues is encouraged. The conference should be designed to attract an international audience, including academics and professionals. It should include several plenary speakers, however, the bulk of each meeting should involve the presentation of traditional academic papers, usually in panels of three or four presentations. The conference should occupy at least two days of meetings in a non-U.S. location. The local partners provide substantial staff and financial support to the conferences. Applicants must be institutional members of APPAM. Deadline: September 10, 2011. Contact: Teyanna Munyan, (301) 405-4767; tmunyan@umd.edu; www.umdcipe.org.

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Summer Programs

2011 Summer Institute in Mental Health Research, June 13-23, 2011. The summer institute, offered by the The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Department of Mental Health, focuses on methodological and substantive topics of importance in mental health and substance use research and services from a public health framework. It is intended for working professionals or students engaged in research, clinical practice, and/or services administration. Courses cover a range of topics including the epidemiology and genetics of mental health and substance use disorders, the implementation and evaluation of mental health services and interventions, and/or the methodological issues encountered in mental health research in the population. For more information, visit www.jhsph.edu/dept/mh/summer_institute. For disability access information or listening devices, contact the Office of Support Services at (410) 955-1197; www.jhsph.edu/SupportServices.

Database Training Seminar: Using the new High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 For Research and Policy Analysis. The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, will sponsor a two-and-a half day advanced studies seminar on the use of longitudinal data for research and policy analysis on July 19-21, 2011. This new dataset captures the coursework, experiences, activities, plans, motivations, and performance in algebra of a nationally representative sample of ninth graders, as well as the influences of schools, teachers, friends, and family in students’ decision-making about courses, college, and careers. The overall goal of this seminar is to provide researchers with opportunities to use the new HSLS:09 data in substantive research. Participants attending the seminar should have a solid understanding of statistical methods and be proficient in the use of SPSS, Stata, or SAS. This seminar is open to researchers, education practitioners, and policy analysts from state and local education agencies and professional associations, as well as advanced graduate students and faculty members from colleges and universities nationwide. There is no fee to attend the seminar. NCES will provide training materials as well as computers for hands-on practice. NCES will also pay for transportation, hotel accommodations, and a fixed per diem for meals and incidental expenses during the training seminar. Contacts: Gordana Vukovic, Synergy Enterprises, Inc., (240) 485-1700.

Knapsack Institute: Transforming Teaching & Learning, June 1-4, 2011. The Knapsack Institute supports educators across the nation as they create curriculum and pedagogy to build inclusive classrooms and organizations. The Institute is a program of The Matrix Center for the Advancement of Social Equity and Inclusion, the home of the White Privilege Conference. The Knapsack Institute provides participants with a framework for teaching about the matrix of privilege and oppression and welcomes all educators (K-12, higher education, diversity trainers, non-profit staff, etc.). Participants spend three days with a team of highly trained and skilled facilitators. For more information, visit www.uccs.edu/~knapsack/.

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