American Sociological Association

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  1. Film Review: abUSed: The Postville Raid

    AbUSed tells the story of how an immigration raid frightened and economically devastated a small town in Iowa. The film is engaging and students learn not only about what happened on that day but also about the inner workings of immigration law. The film provides various perspectives on what happened in Postville on Friday, May 9, 2008. We hear from faith and community leaders, migration experts, lawyers, employees, shopkeepers, and community members.
  2. Walmart’s Consumer Redlining

    When Walmart opened its first two stores in Washington D.C. in late 2013, Mayor Vincent Gray said that the massive retailer would help to solve the problem of “food deserts” in the city.

  3. The Year English Soccer Wasn’t For Sale

    In the 2015/2016 season, the close link between big budgets and soccer dominance broke down in the English Premier League. Here, a look at what motivated the surprise and why American-style sport socialism still isn’t likely to emerge in European leagues.

  4. Socializing Economy

    Michael Lounsbury on Society and Economy: Framework and Principles.

  5. Hope in the Sweatshops of Buenos Aires

    Dreaming and hustling in La Salada, Latin America’s largest low-cost garment marketplace.

  6. Whitewashing the Working Class

    Six essays consider the emotion, economic power, racial animus, alienation, anti-elitism, and exploitation of the “white working class”–and how it all fit into the 2016 election.

  7. Featured Essay: Why Sociologists Matter in the Welfare Reform Debate

    In the 1960s, public support for Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), a federal program that provided cash benefits to eligible poor families with children, began to erode (Teles 1996). Critics of welfare associated the growing number of unwed mothers with the rising rates of AFDC, even though the scientific evidence offered scant support for this claim.
  8. Rich Friends, Poor Friends: Inter–Socioeconomic Status Friendships in Secondary School

    The author examines friendships between students from different socioeconomic groups, investigating the factors that make these relationships more likely and comparing these relationships with those between students from different races, which have been studied more extensively. Consistent with previous research, the results reveal that student homogeneity is positively related to social interaction in schools but that these relationships are not always straightforward with regard to socioeconomic status.

  9. Review Essays: Inequality and Polarization in America

    Doug McAdam and Karina Kloos’s Deeply Divided: Racial Politics and Social Movements in Postwar America provides a powerful and timely analysis of the causes and consequences of growing political polarization and economic inequality. Arguing that social movements have contributed to a reconfiguration of politics, McAdam and Kloos show how the sharp right turn of the Republican Party has generated policies that greatly increase economic inequality.
  10. Seeing Like the Fed: Culture, Cognition, and Framing in the Failure to Anticipate the Financial Crisis of 2008

    Seeing Like the Fed: Culture, Cognition, and Framing in the Failure to Anticipate the Financial Crisis of 2008