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  1. Men in Caring Occupations: Doing Gender Differently

    As there is less written about men in occupations where the majority of workers are women than the reverse, I was looking forward to reading Men in Caring Occupations, especially regarding the four occupations covered—airplane cabin crew, nurses, primary school teachers, and librarians. The focus of the book is how men “negotiate the potential mismatch between the (feminine) nature of the job and a gendered (masculine) identity” (p. 4-5). As the minority group in these occupations, men need to practice their caring skills, but need not feminize as workers.

  2. Stigma Allure and White Antiracist Identity Management

    This article examines how “white antiracists” manage a perceived, and sometimes self-imposed, stigma. Given that whiteness and antiracism are often framed as antonyms, white engagement with matters commonly deemed “nonwhite issues” often involves a presentation of self that unsettles established habit and expected modes of interaction. Adding to the research on race and stigma, I demonstrate how privileged actors repeatedly construct a broken and stigmatized white and antiracist identity in which management of one recreates the stigmatization of the other.

  3. Becoming Black Women: Intimate Stories and Intersectional Identities

    In this article, I argue that intimate stories are an important resource for the achievement of intersectional identities. Drawing on in-depth interviews with black college students at two predominantly white universities, I examine the stories black college women tell about interracial relationships between black men and white women. I argue that interracial stories serve an array of social purposes that go well beyond black women’s intimate lives themselves.

  4. Understanding Feminist Activism among Women: Resources, Consciousness, and Social Networks

    This study examines whether women’s feminist activism is connected to three key factors: sufficient educational and financial resources, the internalization of a feminist consciousness, and being involved in feminist mobilization structures. Analysis of the 2012 American National Election Survey (N = 1,876) suggests that participation and engagement in the women’s movement is least common among less educated women and stay-at-home mothers.
  5. Forced and Coerced Cesarean Sections in the United States

    The rise of the c-section is tied not to maternal or fetal outcomes, but to organizational and legal imperatives. To those ends, a woman’s rights to bodily integrity and decision-making–even the right to refuse surgery–are frequently challenged in childbirth.

  6. Where Punishment and Pregnancy Meet

    Megan Comfort speaks with Carolyn Sufrin, author of Jailcare: Finding the Safety Net for Women Behind Bars.

  7. Marketing Manhood in a “Post-Feminist” Age

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 2, Page 38-43, Spring 2017.
  8. Title IX at XLV

    Defending takes priority over celebrating Title IX as a landmark legislation in essays from Shehzad Nadeem, Cheryl Cooky, Ellen J. Staurowsky, Nicole M. LaVoi, and Erin Buzuvis.
  9. Gender Differences in Context: The Impact of Track Position on Study Involvement in Flemish Secondary Education

    This study examines whether the influence of track position on study involvement is gendered and whether gender differences in study involvement according to track position are associated with school misconduct and rather poor future perspectives. Three-level analyses (HLM 6) of data gathered in 2004-2005 from 11,872 third- and fifth-grade students in 146 tracks in a representative sample of 85 secondary schools in Flanders (Belgium) confirmed the impact of tracking on boys’ as well as girls’ study involvement.
  10. “Gender Utopias?”: U.S. Student Reflections on Studying Abroad in Norway and Sweden

    This article describes a study abroad experience in Norway and Sweden that was designed to explore gender equality in two of the world’s most gender-progressive countries. Course readings explored the work of feminist sociologists and asked students to think critically about gender equality from a cross-cultural perspective. Students met with leaders in Norway and Sweden who are involved in creating gender-progressive policy and culture, including members of parliament, representatives in the film industry, and social policy experts.