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  1. Sociologists Receive ASA Funding to Study Impact of Laws Permitting Concealed Weapons on College Campuses

    If you are a student at a public college or university in Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Mississippi, Oregon, Texas, Utah, or Wisconsin, the person sitting next to you in class may legally have a handgun under that collegiate sweatshirt he or she is wearing. In these 10 states, legislation allows students and faculty members who have concealed weapon licenses to bring their weapons, such as handguns, to campus. In 2014, bills proposing similar legislation were introduced in 14 states.

  2. Heinous Crime or Unfortunate Incident: Does Gender Matter?

    This study replicates and extends earlier investigations of emotional displays of an offender influencing jurors’ sentencing judgments through identity inference. Prior studies of this phenomenon used only male perpetrators. However, culturally shared beliefs about emotion are strongly gendered. Thus, we investigate how the perpetrator’s gender moderates the relationship between emotional displays and sentencing. Results replicate results of previous studies—this time, for both men and women.
  3. Multiple Dimensions of Peer Effects and Deviance: The Case of Prescription Drug Misuse among Young Adults

    Sociological research has demonstrated that peers play a role in patterns of deviance. Yet, examinations of competing mechanisms in continued patterns of deviance are less well developed. We simultaneously examine multiple peer mechanisms of action on prescription drug misuse. Results identify drug sources, peer group norms, and a desire to enhance social experiences as important factors in the frequency of misuse, non-oral administration, and dependence, whereas peer pressure had no effect net of other peer factors.
  4. The Contradictory Logics of Public-Private Place-making and Spatial Justice: The Case of Atlanta's Beltline

    The concept of spatial justice connects social justice to space (Harvey 1973; Lefebvre 1992 and Soja 2010). As Soja (2010) argues, justice has a geography. Spatial justice seeks more equitable distribution of resources in a world where societies are inherently unjust. In theory, many urban design and place-making projects aim to create a more spatially—just city.  That is, until such projects collide against the profit logic and ambitions of the private market.

  5. Race, Class, and the Framing of Drug Epidemics

    by Rebecca Tiger in the Fall 2017 Contexts

    As America’s opiate epidemic rages on, calls for “treatment not punishment” dominate the national media. The hypocrisy of this response is not lost on a range of commentators: the reported move away from criminalization, they argue, is yet another example of racist drug policy. White people get treatment and poor people of color get punishment. Again.

  6. Review Essays: Mass Incarceration and Its Discontents

    The contours of mass incarceration are, by now, broadly familiar. The U.S. incarceration rate began an unprecedented ascent in the 1970s. This trend continued through 2007, when 760 of every 100,000 U.S. residents—nearly 1 in 100 adults—lived behind bars, five million others were on probation or parole, more than ten million were booked into jail, and nearly one in three U.S. residents had a criminal record (Kaeble and Glaze 2016, Table 4; PEW Center on the States 2008; Sabol 2014; Subramanian et al. 2016).
  7. Review Essays: Poverty Police

    Daily life for poor people in America has been transformed by historic growth of the criminal justice system. Sociologists studied the rise in prison populations and the effects of incarceration on life chances. Research showed that imprisonment became common particularly for black men with little schooling. Incarceration was closely associated with low incomes, poor health, and diminished family well-being (Travis et al. 2014 summarizes the research).
  8. Punishment, Religion, and the Shrinking Welfare State for the Very Poor in the United States, 1970–2010

    Punishment, Religion, and the Shrinking Welfare State for the Very Poor in the United States, 1970–2010
  9. Accountability after Genocide

    working to prosecute the perpetrators of genocide, remember its victims, and move forward is an enormous undertaking. after nearly 2 million trials in under a decade, rwanda provides an case study in local legal adaptation toward accountability.

  10. No Rest for the Wicked? The Consequences of Incarceration for Sleep Problems

    About one in every five Americans suffers from inadequate sleep, a key indicator of physical and mental well-being. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we investigate the association between incarceration and two related sleep problems: short sleep duration and symptoms of insomnia. We find that relative to those who have not been incarcerated, those with a history of incarceration have an elevated risk of short sleep duration and insomnia symptoms.