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  1. Call for Papers: Special Issue of JWSR

    Journal of World-Systems Research invites manuscripts for a special issue on "Capitalist World Economy in Crisis: Policing, Pacification and Legitimacy" to be edited by Zeynep Gönen and Zhandarka Kurti.

  2. The Conflicts of Eldercare Provide New Insight into the Nature of Values

    Contact: Naomi Paiss, Communications Director, at (202) 247-9859, npaiss@asanet.org; Johanna Olexy, Senior Communications Associate, at (202) 247-9873, communications@asanet.org.

    SQUARING THE MORAL CIRCLE:
    The Conflicts of Eldercare Provide New Insight into the Nature of Values

     

  3. ASA Statement Condemning Online Harassment

    The American Sociological Association (ASA) expresses deep concern for and solidarity with our colleagues who are suffering vicious online harassment.
     
    These attacks frequently target sociologists for their commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion.  Members of the sociology community from historically marginalized populations, including people of color and members of the LGBTQ community, are frequently singled out for harassment.
     

  4. ASA Is Hiring: Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

    Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
    American Sociological Association

  5. Getting In, Getting Hired, Getting Sideways Looks: Organizational Hierarchy and Perceptions of Racial Discrimination

    This article argues that black workers’ perceptions of racial discrimination derive not just from being in the minority, but also from their position in the organizational structure. Researchers have shown that black individuals encounter an enormous amount of racial discrimination in the workplace, including but not limited to exclusion from critical social networks, wage disparities, and hiring disadvantages.
  6. Mano Suave–Mano Dura: Legitimacy Policing and Latino Stop-and-Frisk

    Stop-and-frisk and other punitive policing practices disproportionately affect marginalized communities of color. In response to calls for reform, police departments have implemented community policing programs aimed at improving relations with racialized communities. This study examines how a police unit used courtesy and respect in its engagement with a criminalized population, gang-associated Latinos, while relying on the stop-and-frisk practice.
  7. Exploiting Ambiguity: A Moral Polysemy Approach to Variation in Economic Practices

    Sociologists have shown that the relationships people establish between moral orientations and market practices vary considerably across historical, geographic, and institutional contexts. Less attention has been paid to situational variation in how the same actors moralize different economic goals, especially in their workplace. This article offers an account of situational variation by theorizing the implications of the ambiguity of moral values for economic activity.
  8. Do Police Brutality Stories Reduce 911 Calls? Reassessing an Important Criminological Finding

    This comment reassesses the prominent claim from Desmond, Papachristos, and Kirk (2016) (DPK) that 911 calls plummeted—and homicides surged—because of a police brutality story in Milwaukee (the Jude story). The results in DPK depend on a substantial outlier 47 weeks after the Jude story, the final week of data. Identical analyses without the outlier final week show that the Jude story had no statistically significant effect on either total 911 calls or violent crime 911 calls.
  9. Evidence of the Effect of Police Violence on Citizen Crime Reporting

    By carefully examining our original data and models, Zoorob identified a potential outlier that should be scrutinized when evaluating our findings. We thank him for raising this important point and for engaging in collaborative, problem-solving research.
  10. Revisiting the Cost of Skin Color: Discrimination, Mastery, and Mental Health among Black Adolescents

    This article investigates the association between skin tone and mental health in a nationally representative sample of black adolescents. The mediating influences of discrimination and mastery in the skin tone–mental health relationship also are considered. Findings indicate that black adolescents with the darkest skin tone have higher levels of depressive symptoms than their lighter skin tone peers. This is not the case for mental disorder. For disorder, a skin tone difference appeared only between black adolescents with very dark skin tone and black adolescents with medium brown skin tone.