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  1. Housing Choices as School Choices: Subsidized Renters’ Agency in an Uncertain Policy Context

    Previous scholarship on the federal Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program has found that HCV renters are less likely than other households living below the poverty line to live in neighborhoods with high-performing schools. These findings are troubling because HCV renters have some choice about where they live, yet aggregate data linking HCV renters’ neighborhoods with school performance shows that renters tend to be concentrated in impoverished areas with poor schools.

  2. Community and the Crime Decline: The Causal Effect of Local Nonprofits on Violent Crime

    Largely overlooked in the theoretical and empirical literature on the crime decline is a long tradition of research in criminology and urban sociology that considers how violence is regulated through informal sources of social control arising from residents and organizations internal to communities. In this article, we incorporate the “systemic” model of community life into debates on the U.S. crime drop, and we focus on the role that local nonprofit organizations played in the national decline of violence from the 1990s to the 2010s.
  3. Neighborhood and Identity: An Explorative Study of the Local and Ethnic Identities of Young Ethnic Minorities in Belgium

    In this paper, a qualitative study is conducted in different neighborhoods in the Belgian city of Ghent to investigate the local attachments of young ethnic minorities and how these are related to ethnic identities. Analysis of the narratives of the young people shows that ethnic and local identities do not have to be mutually exclusive but are in a complex interaction. The first narrative distinguished is characterized by the expression of a strong neighborhood identity along with positive attitudes toward others.

  4. “This is an Italian Church with a Large Hispanic Population”: Factors and Strategies in White Ethno-Religious Place Making

    This paper examines how a group of white ethnic, mostly Italian American, Catholics participate in ethno-religious place making in a predominantly Latino church. In light of a growing number of Latino parishioners, white ethnic church members engage in place making activities to ascribe a white ethno-religious identity to place. Drawing on participant observations, interviews, and archival documents, I examine the impetus behind, and strategies used, in making ethno-religious place. I find that place attachment and group threat drive white ethnics to make place.

  5. Examining Neighborhood Opportunity and Locational Outcomes for Housing Choice Voucher Recipients: A Comparative Study between Duval County, Florida, and Bexar County, Texas

    Recent attention has highlighted the importance of providing low-income households access to opportunity-rich neighborhoods. Using a neighborhood opportunity framework developed specifically for the Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program, this study investigates whether low-income households participating in the program live in opportunity areas. The results indicate that with scarce high-opportunity neighborhoods, most HCV households reside in mixed opportunity areas and face tradeoffs when deciding where to live.

  6. “They're Colonizing My Neighborhood”: (Perceptions of) Social Mix in Canada

    In recent years, urban neighborhoods in many Western nations have undergone neighborhood restructuring initiatives, especially in public housing developments. Regent Park, Canada's oldest and largest public housing development, is a neighborhood currently undergoing ‘neighborhood revitalization’ based on the social mix model. One tenet of this model is the idea that original public housing residents are benefiting from interactions with middle class residents.

  7. The Contradictory Logics of Public-Private Place-making and Spatial Justice: The Case of Atlanta's Beltline

    The concept of spatial justice connects social justice to space (Harvey 1973; Lefebvre 1992 and Soja 2010). As Soja (2010) argues, justice has a geography. Spatial justice seeks more equitable distribution of resources in a world where societies are inherently unjust. In theory, many urban design and place-making projects aim to create a more spatially—just city.  That is, until such projects collide against the profit logic and ambitions of the private market.

  8. The New Bohemia as Urban Institution

    Bohemia, the colorful intersection of place, lifestyle, and artistic imagination, is rooted in the urban revolutions of 19th century Paris, and has proven to be a durable and transposable tradition of modernity in the nearly two centuries since. We have ideas about what living like an artist in the city should look like, and these in turn continue to powerfully shape what it does look like, culturally and materially. This cultural continuity today interacts with the structural transformation of the US economy and of American cities.

  9. Designing for and against Symbolic Boundaries

    Urban design is the physical realization of the collective imagination of the city and more importantly, what the city should be. To oversimplify, urban designs have gone through three phases that largely mirror economic shifts in the broader economy. We have seen urban design transition from the desire to organize the chaotic city, to the architecture of fear and suburbanization in the declining and segregated city, to today's design and placemaking, which mirrors the financialization of the city and the rise of the service economy.