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  1. Socius Special Issue Call for Papers

    Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World invites papers for a special issue on gender in the 2016 elections. We invite contributions on all topics relevant to gender and politics. Potential topics could include (but are not limited to): gender and the executive; women, social policy, and state legislative elections; intersectionality and the media; gender and public opinion; and women in changing political institutions. Informative papers on trends or cross-national comparisons are welcome as long as they are framed in relation to the 2016 U.S. election.

  2. Own Gender, Sibling’s Gender, Parent’s Gender: The Division of Elderly Parent Care among Adult Children

    Research on the gender division of family labor largely focuses on housework and childcare in spousal couples. This article advances scholarship by examining the gender division of elderly parent care in sibling groups. Using the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative survey of elderly Americans, I find that caregiving to elderly parents varies not only by an adult child’s own gender, but also by the gender of the siblings with whom caregiving is shared and by the gender of the parent to whom care is provided.

  3. (How) Does Obesity Harm Academic Performance? Stratification at the Intersection of Race, Sex, and Body Size in Elementary and High School

    In this study I hypothesize a larger penalty of obesity on teacher-assessed academic performance for white girls in English, where femininity is privileged, than in math, where stereotypical femininity is perceived to be a detriment. This pattern of associations would be expected if obesity largely influences academic performance through social pathways, such as discrimination and stigma.

  4. Familial Transmission of Educational Plans and the Academic Self-Concept: A Three-Generation Longitudinal Study

    This research investigates the social reproduction of inequality by drawing on prospective longitudinal data from three generations of Youth Development Study respondents. It examines intergenerational influence on the relatively unexplored academic self-concept as well as educational plans, a critical component of the status attainment model.

  5. Gender, Sexuality, and Intimacy: A Contexts Reader

    This new anthology from SAGE brings together over 90 recent readings on gender, sexuality, and intimate relationships from Contexts, the award-winning magazine published by the American Sociological Association. Each contributor is a contemporary sociologist writing in the clear, concise, and jargon-free style that has made Contexts the "public face" of sociology.

  6. Crisis or Chronic Strain?

    Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Volume 58, Issue 1, Page 54-69, March 2017.
  7. Children’s Education and Parents’ Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms

    Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Volume 58, Issue 1, Page 86-101, March 2017.
  8. Venus, Mars, and Math: Gender, Societal Affluence, and Eighth Graders’ Aspirations for STEM

    The author explores how the gender gap in aspirations for scientific, technical, engineering, and mathematical (STEM) work changes with societal affluence. Over-time data on cohorts of eighth graders in 32 countries reveal that aspirations for mathematically related work become more gender differentiated as societal affluence grows.
  9. Winter 2017 Contexts Online Free until April 21

    Letter from the Editors

    Trumped Again

  10. Girls Behaving Badly? Race, Gender, and Subjective Evaluation in the Discipline of African American Girls

    School disciplinary processes are an important mechanism of inequality in education. Most prior research in this area focuses on the significantly higher rates of punishment among African American boys, but in this article, we turn our attention to the discipline of African American girls. Using advanced multilevel models and a longitudinal data set of detailed school discipline records, we analyze interactions between race and gender on office referrals. The results show troubling and significant disparities in the punishment of African American girls.