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  1. “This is for the Brown Kids!”: Racialization and the Formation of “Muslim” Punk Rock

    Recent research shows that non-Muslims “read” Muslim and non-Muslim Others through an Islamophobic lens, whether the victims of Islamophobia are practitioners of Islam or not. Yet how Muslims and non-Muslims band together against anti-Muslim racism in nonreligious ways and venues is less understood.
  2. Horizontal Immobility

    American Sociological Review, Volume 82, Issue 2, Page 270-296, April 2017.
  3. Culture Remains Elusive

    American Sociological Review, Volume 82, Issue 2, Page 435-443, April 2017.
  4. Safety pins, awareness ribbons, and the challenges of new symbols

    For many Americans, safety pins have suddenly appeared everywhere: Pinned to shirts, posted to Facebook, or worn by celebrities. When I started wearing one a handful of strangers asked “what the heck are these safety pins all about?” This is the challenge of new symbols. Before they can work people need to know what they mean.

  5. Review Essays: Making Money Matter

    Author of The Sociology of Money (1994), Nigel Dodd advances the current fascination with “media of exchange,” from his position at the London School of Economics, by wisely entering sustained dialogue with Marx and Simmel, as well as with many lesser lights from more recent times. This finely produced volume sports all the appurtenances nowadays expected of the serious monograph: comprehensive scope in digestible prose, plentiful footnotes, endless citations to, and dialogue with, other scholars’ works, and a splendid bibliography in reduced font (pp. 395–420).
  6. Journeys in Sociology: From First Encounters to Fulfilling Retirements

    The editors and twenty contributors to the essential anthology Journeys in Sociology use a life-course perspective to address the role of sociology in their lives. The power of their personal experiences—during the Great Depression, World War II, or the student protests and social movements in the 1960s and '70s—magnify how and why social change prompted these men and women to study sociology. Moreover, all of the contributors include a discussion of their activities in retirement. 

  7. Culture, Styles of Institutional Interactions, and Inequalities in Healthcare Experiences

    Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Volume 58, Issue 2, Page 147-165, June 2017.
  8. Less Theory. More Description.

    Sociology must worry less about theoretical innovation and more about empirical description.
  9. Who Is This “We” You Speak of? Grounding Activist Identity in Social Psychology

    What is an activist identity? Prior answers have focused almost exclusively on collective identity, without (a) considering the possibility of role-based identities or (b) grounding collective identities in broader social-psychological theories. The present study investigates activist identity through the lens of role-based and category-based identities and reports two major findings. First, there is a distinct role-based activist identity, one that involves internalizing role responsibilities and the expectations of friends and family.
  10. Review Essays: Sociology’s Messy Eating: Food, Consumer Choice, and Social Change

    In 2002, the historian Warren Belasco remarked that while “food is important . . . food scholars may still evoke a sense of surprise” (Belasco 2002, pp. 2, 5). The sociological importance of food should be obvious: one need not be a Marxist to recognize that food production forms an essential infrastructure for other sorts of social activities, nor a Weberian to perceive the role of eating in status and social closure. And yet, at the time of Belasco’s writing, identifying one’s primary research area as “food” to colleagues at an ASA meeting could evoke a cocked eyebrow and an awkward pause.