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  1. The [Un]Surprising Alt-Right

    by Robert Futrell and Pete Simi

    The night that Barack Obama was elected President in 2008, the White supremacist web forum Stormfront lit up with posts about racial extremists’ fantastical visions of violence to combat “White racial genocide.” On election night 2016, Stormfront lit up again as White supremacists expressed triumph with Donald Trump’s victory. They celebrated: “We finally have one of us in the White House again!”

  2. When DNA Evidence Challenges Ideas of A Person’s Racial Purity, White Supremacists Use a Decision Tree to Affirm or Discount the Results

    Now that science can determine a person’s racial and ethnic origins from a cheek swab, those devoted to ideas of racial “purity,” are employing methods of mind games and logic twists to support their beliefs despite facing evidence of their own multiracial heritage.

  3. Doing Diagnosis: Autism, Interaction Order, and the Use of Narrative in Clinical Talk

    This study, with an eye toward the social psychology of diagnosis more generally, is an investigation of how clinicians diagnose children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Responding to Hacking’s call for a Goffmanian mode of analysis to complement and balance the emphasis on large-scale transformations and discourses, we examine the narrative way in which clinicians provide evidence to support a diagnostic position.
  4. Pulled Over: How Police Stops Define Race and Citizenship

    Pulled Over: How Police Stops Define Race and Citizenship, by Charles R. Epp, Steven Maynard-Moody, and Donald HaiderMarkel.

  5. The [Un]Surprising Alt-Right

    Robert Futrell and Pete Simi on the simmering sentiments and political fortunes of White supremacists.
  6. On the Recent Attacks and Violence toward Progressive Scholars

    The past few years have seen a remarkable rise in the volume and intensity of attacks on progressive scholars, in particular scholars of color, and even more particularly progressive scholars of color whose work critically investigate extant intersectional social inequalities. These attacks, although not new—we recognize similar attacks on many of our founding scholars, such as Ida B. Wells and W.E.B. DuBois, for example—have become more intense, are better organized, and have become patterned in their tactics of harassment and violence.

  7. Communicating Across Difference: Free and Responsible Speech

    Attacks on the speech of students, faculty, and visitors on college campuses have a long history. Not only are such attacks continuing, but social media has generated a climate in which campaigns of intimidation can be organized quickly and easily and the current political climate seems to have released the reins of restraint. Particularly troubling has been the disproportionate number of targets of intimidation campaigns who are scholars from historically marginalized populations, including people of color and members of the LGBTQ community.  

  8. Forced and Coerced Cesarean Sections in the United States

    The rise of the c-section is tied not to maternal or fetal outcomes, but to organizational and legal imperatives. To those ends, a woman’s rights to bodily integrity and decision-making–even the right to refuse surgery–are frequently challenged in childbirth.

  9. Desperation and Service in the Bail Industry

    In a cutthroat business, bail bond agents leverage their clients’ unmet needs for information and support to get a leg up on the competition. Service is entwined with aggressive, even predatory profit-seeking.