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  1. First-Generation Sociology Majors

    First-generation immigrants studying as sociology majors see excellent employment outcomes.

  2. Domestic Workers Refusing Neo-Slavery in the UAE

    Dubai’s Kafala system regulates the lives, labors, and mobility of migrant domestic workers who have seen no new rights with reforms. this is how they resist.

  3. Soft and Hard Landings in Transatlantic Crossings

    Soft and hard landings in transatlantic crossings Mabel Berezin on Strangers No More.

  4. Hamilton's Immigrant America

    Philip Kasinitz on the brash young insurgents of "Hamilton" - and the American Revolution.

  5. The Year English Soccer Wasn’t For Sale

    In the 2015/2016 season, the close link between big budgets and soccer dominance broke down in the English Premier League. Here, a look at what motivated the surprise and why American-style sport socialism still isn’t likely to emerge in European leagues.

  6. New Americans and Civic Engagement in the U.S.

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 2, Page 68-70, Spring 2017.
  7. Socializing Economy

    Michael Lounsbury on Society and Economy: Framework and Principles.

  8. Commuter Spouses and the Changing American Family

    the rise of commuter marriage reflects decades of social change in women’s workplace participation, american individualism, technological saturation, bureaucratic hurdles, and the symbolic significance of marriage itself.

  9. Rethinking the Boundaries: Competitive Threat and the Asymmetric Salience of Race/Ethnicity in Attitudes toward Immigrants

    Research on attitudes toward immigrants has come to divergent conclusions regarding the role of race and ethnicity in shaping these attitudes. Using survey data from 18 European countries, the authors analyze how conditions associated with both economic and cultural threat shape respondents’ receptivity to establishing relationships with immigrants of the same race or ethnicity versus immigrants of a different race or ethnicity. The analyses reveal that the salience of racial and ethnic differences in shaping attitudes toward immigrants is asymmetric.
  10. Conceptualizing American Attitudes toward Immigrants Dual Loyalty

    Abdi M. Kusow, Matt DeLisi
    Jun 15, 2016; 2:237802311-237802311
    Original Article