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  1. Asking the Right Questions: Teaching about Islam and Globalization

    Teaching Sociology, Volume 45, Issue 4, Page 379-387, October 2017.
  2. Stress Buffer or Identity Threat? Negative Media Portrayal, Public and Private Religious Involvement, and Mental Health in a National Sample of U.S. Adults

    Guided by the stress process tradition, complex links between religion and mental health have received growing attention from researchers. This study gauges individuals’ public and private religiosity, uses a novel measure of environmental stress—negative media portrayal of religion—and presents two divergent hypotheses: (1) religiosity as stress-exacerbating attachment to valued identities producing mental health vulnerability to threat and (2) religiosity as stress-buffering social psychological resource.
  3. Discrimination-related Anger, Religion, and Distress: Differences between African Americans and Caribbean Black Americans

    The Charleston Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church (AMEC) survivors’ forgiveness of the racially motivated shootings prompted our research of the association between religion, discrimination-related anger, and psychological distress among black Americans. Using the first representative national sample of Caribbean black Americans, the National Survey of American Life, we examine if discrimination-related anger produces more psychological distress for African Americans than Caribbean black Americans and if religious emotional support lowers distress from discrimination-related anger.
  4. Not Just Black and White: How Race/Ethnicity and Gender Intersect in Hookup Culture

    The increasing interest in research on hookups (i.e., noncommittal unions focused on sexual acts ranging from kissing to intercourse) often highlights individual-level predictors (e.g., alcohol use, attitudes) or gender/class differences. Racial/ethnic comparisons are often portrayed as White/non-White, despite literature on differing experiences within race by gender due to institutional-level differences, standards of beauty, and sexual stereotypes.
  5. When Does Differential Treatment Become Perceived Discrimination? An Intersectional Analysis in a Southern Brazilian Population

    Despite ideals of equality and “racial democracy,” high levels of social inequality persist in contemporary Brazil. In addition, while the majority of the Brazilian population acknowledges the persistence of racism, high proportions of socially disadvantaged groups do not regard themselves as victims of discrimination. This study seeks to shed light on this issue by investigating the processes through which individuals come to interpret their experiences of mistreatment as discrimination.
  6. Tableside Justice: Racial Differences in Retributive Reactions to Dissatisfaction

    Existing evidence indicates that racial discrimination is a common, if not pervasive, feature of Black Americans’ experiences in U.S. consumer markets. However, few studies have quantitatively explored specific social psychological and interactional consequences of consumer racial discrimination. In response, we draw from literatures on experiences, attributions, and reactions to racial discrimination to posit and test for Black-White differences in consumers’ behavioral responses to dissatisfactory dining experiences.
  7. No Rest for the Weary: The Weight of Race, Gender, and Place inside and outside a Southern Classroom

    No Rest for the Weary: The Weight of Race, Gender, and Place inside and outside a Southern Classroom
  8. God’s Case for Sex

    This article complicates a popular notion that conservative religions are incompatible with sexual expression and pleasure. Case studies from Orthodox Judaism and evangelical Protestant Christianity demonstrate a breadth of sexual expressions and negotiations of desire and sin that defy the association of conservative religions with sexual repression.

  9. Religion, Migration, and Change in a European City

    A sociologist of religion, culture, and globalization captures all three at work in Antwerp.

  10. Black lives and police tactics matter

    by Rory Kramer, Brianna Remster, and Camille Z. Charles in the Summer 2017 Contexts