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  1. Ideals as Anchors for Relationship Experiences

    Research on young-adult sexuality in sub-Saharan Africa typically conceptualizes sex as an individual-level risk behavior. We introduce a new approach that connects the conditions surrounding the initiation of sex with subsequent relationship well-being, examines relationships as sequences of interdependent events, and indexes relationship experiences to individually held ideals. New card-sort data from southern Malawi capture young women’s relationship experiences and their ideals in a sequential framework.

  2. Tradition and Innovation in Scientists’ Research Strategies

    What factors affect a scientist’s choice of research problem? Qualitative research in the history and sociology of science suggests that this choice is patterned by an “essential tension” between productive tradition and risky innovation. We examine this tension through Bourdieu’s field theory of science, and we explore it empirically by analyzing millions of biomedical abstracts from MEDLINE. We represent the evolving state of chemical knowledge with networks extracted from these abstracts. We then develop a typology of research strategies on these networks.

  3. Taking Time-Off Work to Raise Children is Damaging to the Careers of Highly Skilled, High Earning Women

    Mothers who leave work to raise children often sacrifice more than the pay for their time off; when they come back their wages reflect lost raises, according to a new study by Paula England, Professor of Sociology at New York University.

  4. Blue-Collar Training in High School Leaves Women Behind

    What’s the best way to prepare high schoolers for jobs in the 21st century? Education leaders and the general public have been debating this question with more heat in recent years, clashing over whether to focus on college preparation or vocational training, especially training linked to blue-collar jobs.

  5. America's Biggest Secret or Life in a Culture of Pay Secrecy?

    My eight-year-old daughter received the classic Hasbro Game of Life as a holiday gift this past year.  What caught my attention right away while playing the game with her were the salaries.

  6. Book Review: Race, Place, and Suburban Policing: Too Close for Comfort

    With questions of racial justice at the forefront of public discourse, especially in relation to police violence, this book presents a timely investigation.

  7. Is your employer watching you? Profiling and the blurring of public/private boundaries

    A new study has revealed that 27% of employees have witnessed their employer using online information to ‘profile’ job applicants. Approximately 55% of organizations now have a policy outlining how profiling can and should be used as an organizational strategy.

  8. Methodological Advances and Applications in Social Psychology

    This special issue highlights new methodological approaches to advance developments in social psychology and expand the methodological toolbox for quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods researchers. We showcase articles that offer a range of innovations, including new methodological approaches, applications, and procedures. The authors link their methodological innovations to the new theoretical insights produced and provide empirical examples that show how their methods advance social psychological theory.

  9. Give Permission to Use Your Work in the Digital Archives

    Up until now, it has not been easy to study empirically the process of scientific knowledge production because we rarely have access to a body of data that includes what is rejected as well as what is accepted for publication, and the reasons for these decisions.

  10. Study Shows How a Community’s Culture and Social Connectedness Can Increase Suicide Risk

    Community characteristics play a major role in perpetuating teen suicide clusters and thwarting prevention efforts, according to a new study by sociologists at the University of Chicago (UChicago) and University of Memphis who examined clusters in a single town.