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  1. Fifty Years of “New” Immigration

    Moving forward from the Hart-Cellar Act with John D. Skrentny, Jennifer Lee, Jody Aguis Vallejo, Zulema Valdez, and Donna R. Gabaccia.

  2. Social Mobility among Second-Generation Latinos

    New data shows that Latinos weathered the recession well and are poised to seize opportunities for further social mobility.

  3. First-Generation Sociology Majors

    First-generation immigrants studying as sociology majors see excellent employment outcomes.

  4. Domestic Workers Refusing Neo-Slavery in the UAE

    Dubai’s Kafala system regulates the lives, labors, and mobility of migrant domestic workers who have seen no new rights with reforms. this is how they resist.

  5. Soft and Hard Landings in Transatlantic Crossings

    Soft and hard landings in transatlantic crossings Mabel Berezin on Strangers No More.

  6. Hamilton's Immigrant America

    Philip Kasinitz on the brash young insurgents of "Hamilton" - and the American Revolution.

  7. New Americans and Civic Engagement in the U.S.

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 2, Page 68-70, Spring 2017.
  8. Rethinking the Boundaries: Competitive Threat and the Asymmetric Salience of Race/Ethnicity in Attitudes toward Immigrants

    Research on attitudes toward immigrants has come to divergent conclusions regarding the role of race and ethnicity in shaping these attitudes. Using survey data from 18 European countries, the authors analyze how conditions associated with both economic and cultural threat shape respondents’ receptivity to establishing relationships with immigrants of the same race or ethnicity versus immigrants of a different race or ethnicity. The analyses reveal that the salience of racial and ethnic differences in shaping attitudes toward immigrants is asymmetric.
  9. Arrested by Skin Color: Evidence from Siblings and a Nationally Representative Sample

    Racial disparities in the criminal justice system are striking, but social scientists know little about skin color inequalities within this system. Research demonstrates that racial minorities with darker skin are more disadvantaged than their lighter skinned counterparts. However, scholars often analyze individuals across families without considering that skin color differences also exist within families. I improve on prior studies with an underused, within-family approach using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health.
  10. Conceptualizing American Attitudes toward Immigrants Dual Loyalty

    Abdi M. Kusow, Matt DeLisi
    Jun 15, 2016; 2:237802311-237802311
    Original Article