American Sociological Association

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  1. The Bourgeoisie Dream Factory

    Effectively teaching sociological theories to undergraduate students is challenging. Students often enroll in theory courses due to major requirements, not personal interest. Consequently, many students approach the study of theory with anxiety. This study examined the effectiveness of an experiential learning activity designed to teach Karl Marx’s theory of alienation. Based on pretest/posttest surveys, responses to open-ended questions, and observational data, students reported that the activity helped them gain a clearer understanding of Marx.

  2. Community Disorder, Victimization Exposure, and Mental Health in a National Sample of Youth

    This study considers whether elevated distress among youth living in more disordered neighborhoods can be explained by personal exposure to violence and victimization, level of non-victimization adversity, and family support. Analyses were based on a sample of 2,039 youth ages 10 to 17 who participated in the National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence, a national telephone survey conducted in 2008.

  3. Other People's Racism: Race, Rednecks, and Riots in a Southern High School

    This article uses data drawn from nine months of fieldwork and student, teacher, and administrator interviews at a southern high school to analyze school racial conflict and the construction of racism. We find that institutional inequalities that stratify students by race and class are routinely ignored by school actors who, we argue, use the presence of so-called redneck students to plausibly deny racism while furthering the standard definition of racism as blatant prejudice and an individual trait.

  4. The Contradictory Logics of Public-Private Place-making and Spatial Justice: The Case of Atlanta's Beltline

    The concept of spatial justice connects social justice to space (Harvey 1973; Lefebvre 1992 and Soja 2010). As Soja (2010) argues, justice has a geography. Spatial justice seeks more equitable distribution of resources in a world where societies are inherently unjust. In theory, many urban design and place-making projects aim to create a more spatially—just city.  That is, until such projects collide against the profit logic and ambitions of the private market.

  5. Teaching about Race and Ethnicity: Trying to Uncover White Privilege for a White Audience

    Teaching about Race and Ethnicity: Trying to Uncover White Privilege for a White Audience