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  1. Sexualities

    For many years, sexuality was approached as an individual, biological or psychological phenomena. Today, the idea of sexuality as a social fact or construction is the point of departure for much of the most exciting scholarship in the area.

    - Steve Seidman, Gil Zicklin, and Mark Hager

  2. What is the Section on Sexualities?

    In the last decade or so, the study of sexuality has emerged as a vibrant interdisciplinary field of social analysis. For many years, sexuality was approached as an individual, biological or psychological phenomena. Today, the idea of sexuality as a social fact or construction is the point of departure for much of the most exciting scholarship in the area...

  3. Council Minutes

    Minutes of ASA Council Meetings

    Minutes are prepared for each meeting of the ASA Council and approved the following meeting.  Once approved, minutes will be posted here. 

    2019

  4. ASA Staff Directory

    CONTACT ASA

    General Inquiries: ASA@asanet.org or (202) 383-9005

    Annual Meeting
    meetings@asanet.org

    Communications
    communications@asanet.org

  5. Section Membership Data

    ASA continously tracks the number of members in its sections. Section membership changes on a daily basis as more members join throughout the year. Click here for current section membership counts as of September 16th, 2019. Below are the final counts as of the last day of the membership year, September 30.  

  6. Community and Urban Sociology Section Awards Recipients History

    Community and Urban Sociology Graduate Student Paper Award

    2019: Zachary Hyde, University of British Columbia, “Giving Back to Get Ahead: Altruism as a Developer Strategy of Accumulation Through Affordable Housing Policy in Toronto and Vancouver,” Geoforum 2018.

    2019 Honorable Mention: Christine Jang-Trettien, Johns Hopkins University, “Social Structure of the Informal Housing Market”

  7. Sacred Alters: The Effects of Ego Network Structure on Religious and Political Beliefs

    Does who we know impact how strongly we believe? The claim seems reasonable, but research linking social network composition to political beliefs has produced conflicting results. We argue that methodological differences in measuring close ties can explain these inconsistencies and that work on the sacred umbrella provides a useful framework for moving forward. The sacred umbrella argues that when people close to you share your religious beliefs, you are shielded from doubt and uncertainty; perhaps the same mechanism also operates for political views.
  8. Social Networks, Support, and Depressive Symptoms: Gender Differences among Clergy

    This study extends social-psychological research on social networks and mental health by examining cross-gender differences in social integration and depression among United Methodist clergy in North Carolina. Using data from the fifth wave of the Clergy Health Initiative panel survey, we used cross-group models to examine the association of depressive symptoms and network in-degree, out-degree, and perceived social isolation among men (N = 1,145) and women (N = 535) clergy. The analysis reveals gendered differences in this association.
  9. Introduction to the Special Collection on the Fragile Families Challenge

    The Fragile Families Challenge is a scientific mass collaboration designed to measure and understand the predictability of life trajectories. Participants in the Challenge created predictive models of six life outcomes using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a high-quality birth cohort study. This Special Collection includes 12 articles describing participants’ approaches to predicting these six outcomes as well as 3 articles describing methodological and procedural insights from running the Challenge.
  10. Successes and Struggles with Computational Reproducibility: Lessons from the Fragile Families Challenge

    Reproducibility is fundamental to science, and an important component of reproducibility is computational reproducibility: the ability of a researcher to recreate the results of a published study using the original author’s raw data and code. Although most people agree that computational reproducibility is important, it is still difficult to achieve in practice. In this article, the authors describe their approach to enabling computational reproducibility for the 12 articles in this special issue of Socius about the Fragile Families Challenge.