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  1. Venus, Mars, and Math: Gender, Societal Affluence, and Eighth Graders’ Aspirations for STEM

    The author explores how the gender gap in aspirations for scientific, technical, engineering, and mathematical (STEM) work changes with societal affluence. Over-time data on cohorts of eighth graders in 32 countries reveal that aspirations for mathematically related work become more gender differentiated as societal affluence grows.
  2. Girls Behaving Badly? Race, Gender, and Subjective Evaluation in the Discipline of African American Girls

    School disciplinary processes are an important mechanism of inequality in education. Most prior research in this area focuses on the significantly higher rates of punishment among African American boys, but in this article, we turn our attention to the discipline of African American girls. Using advanced multilevel models and a longitudinal data set of detailed school discipline records, we analyze interactions between race and gender on office referrals. The results show troubling and significant disparities in the punishment of African American girls.
  3. The Converging Gender Wage Gap 1980–2012

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 72-74, Winter 2016.
  4. Intersex and the Social Construction of Sex

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 80-80, Winter 2016.
  5. When Being in the Minority Pays Off

    Economic sociologists have studied how social relationships shape market prices by focusing mostly on vertical interactions between buyers and sellers. In this article, we examine instead the price consequences of horizontal relationships that arise from intergroup processes among sellers. Our setting is the market for Champagne grapes. Using proprietary transaction-level data, we find that female grape growers—a minority in the growers’ community—charge systematically higher prices than do male grape growers.
  6. Sources of Segregation in Social Networks: A Novel Approach Using Facebook

    <p>Most research on segregation in social networks considers small circles of strong ties, and little is known about segregation among the much larger number of weaker ties. This article proposes a novel approach to the study of these more extended networks, through the use of data on personal ties in an online social network. We illustrate this method’s potential by describing and explaining the degree of ethnic and gender segregation on Facebook among a representative survey of adolescents in the Netherlands (N = 2,810; ~1.1 million Facebook friends).

  7. The Effects of Gendered Occupational Roles on Men’s and Women’s Workplace Authority: Evidence from Microfinance

    The Effects of Gendered Occupational Roles on Men’s and Women’s Workplace Authority: Evidence from Microfinance
  8. Behavior Patterns, Performance Expectations, Gender, and Task Focus: A Replication and Extension

    Behavior Patterns, Performance Expectations, Gender, and Task Focus: A Replication and Extension Murray Webster, Lisa Slattery Walker
  9. Lgbttsqqiaa…

    Melissa M. Wilcox provides a historical overview of the development of self-chosen terminology among same-sex attracted and gender-nonconforming people in the twentieth and twenty-first century, particularly in Western Anglophone cultures. She explains why certain terms are preferred over others, as well as when and why the preferred terms have changed.

  10. Reproducing (and Disrupting) Heteronormativity: Gendered Sexual Socialization in Preschool Classrooms

    Using ethnographic data from 10 months of observations in nine preschool classrooms, I examine gendered sexual socialization children receive from teachers’ practices and reproduce through peer interactions. I find heteronormativity permeates preschool classrooms, where teachers construct (and occasionally disrupt) gendered sexuality in a number of different ways, and children reproduce (and sometimes resist) these identities and norms in their daily play. Teachers use what I call facilitative, restrictive, disruptive, and passive approaches to sexual socialization in preschool classrooms.