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  1. Conceptualizing American Attitudes toward Immigrants Dual Loyalty

    Abdi M. Kusow, Matt DeLisi
    Jun 15, 2016; 2:237802311-237802311
    Original Article
  2. Sociological Insights for Development Policy

    The Sociology of Development Section announces a new policy brief series: Sociological Insights for Development Policy. The purpose of the series is not only to raise awareness of the thought-provoking research being done by members of the section, but also to strengthen engagement between scholars, policy makers and development practitioners. The long-term aim is to enhance sociology’s impact on development discourse and practice throughout the world. Sociological Insights for Development Policy publish short (2-page) briefs that are distilled from section members’ research.

  3. How Contact Experiences Shape Welcoming: Perspectives from U.S.-Born and Immigrant Groups

    This research examines how intergroup contact experiences—including both their frequency and their qualities (friendly, discriminatory)—predict indicators of welcoming among U.S.-born and immigrant groups. Analyzing a new survey of U.S.-born groups (whites and blacks) and immigrant groups (Mexicans and Indians) from the Atlanta and Philadelphia metropolitan areas (total N = 2,006), we examine welcoming as a key dimension of social integration.
  4. Using Google Trends to Measure Issue Salience for Hard-to-Survey Populations

    Some populations are difficult to survey. This poses a problem for researchers who want to understand what issues matter to these populations and how the salience of those concerns varies over time. In this visualization article, the authors illustrate how Google Trends can be used to examine issue salience for hard-to-survey mass populations.
  5. Peer Attitudes and the Development of Prejudice in Adolescence

    According to a number of psychological and sociological theories, individuals are susceptible to social influence from their immediate social environment, especially during adolescence. An important social context is the network of one’s peers. However, data limitations, specifically a lack of longitudinal data with information about respondents’ social networks, have limited previous analyses of the relationship between peers and prejudice over time. In this article, we rely on a five-wave panel of adolescents, aged either 13 or 16 in wave 1 (N = 1,009).
  6. Race and the Politics of Deception: The Making of an American City

    In Race and the Politics of Deception: The Making of an American City, Christopher Mele traces the history of Chester, Pennsylvania, a city on the Delaware River just outside of Philadelphia, from the early 1900s to the present. Chester’s history closely parallels that of other U.S. cities from Baltimore to Chicago. The Great Migration brought thousands of African Americans to the burgeoning industrial boomtown during World War I.
  7. Trump’s Immigration Attacks, in Brief

    A look at the Trump administration’s attacks on Mexicans, Muslims, and unauthorized immigrants and how they’ve undermined longstanding policy and public perception.
  8. Higher Ed can Learn from First-Gen Students

    Jessica Cobb on teaching–and learning from–first-gen college students.
  9. Linguistic Integration and Immigrant Health: The Longitudinal Effects of Interethnic Social Capital

    The literature on immigrant health has by and large focused on the relationship between acculturation (often measured by a shift in language use) and health outcomes, paying less attention to network processes and the implications of interethnic integration for long-term health. This study frames English-language use among immigrants in the United States as a reflection of bridging social capital that is indicative of social network diversity.
  10. Institutions, Incorporation, and Inequality: The Case of Minority Health Inequalities in Europe

    Scholars interested in the relationship between social context and health have recently turned attention further “upstream” to understand how political, social, and economic institutions shape the distribution of life chances across contexts. We compare minority health inequalities across 22 European countries (N = 199,981) to investigate how two such arrangements—welfare state effort and immigrant incorporation policies—influence the distribution of health and health inequalities. We examine two measures of health from seven waves of the European Social Survey.