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  1. Working at the Intersection of Race and Public Policy: The Promise (and Perils) of Putting Research to Work for Societal Transformation

    Today, race and ethnicity scholars generate a wealth of important research that documents the parameters of racial and/or ethnic inequality, how such inequality persists, and how it relates to, or intersects with, other dimensions of social life. Here we argue that these scholars should devote their abundant intellectual energies not only to illuminating the parameters and causes of racial injustice but also to producing work that might shift popular understandings and stimulate change.

  2. The Queer Work of Militarized Prides

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 4, Page 32-37, Fall 2017.
  3. Race, Class, and the Framing of Drug Epidemics

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 4, Page 46-51, Fall 2017.
  4. Fat Eggs or Fit Bodies

    How HIV treatment, fertility fears, and western values have confounded traditional beauty ideals in Botswana.
  5. Chump Change

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 12-23, Winter 2016.
  6. Could There Be a Silver Lining to Zika?

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 36-41, Winter 2016.
  7. The Hidden Privilege in “Potty Politics”

    The purpose, emergence, and accessibility of public restrooms in the U.S. have always involved battles over privacy, cleanliness, segregation, and legislation.
  8. Is the Public Getting Smarter on Crime?

    The crime rate surely ranks among the most used and abused social indicators. In politics, media, and popular culture, crime and punishment are invoked to stir up strong public sentiments. But while crime is clearly a social construction, it is also a real concern for individuals, families, and communities. So we can learn a lot by asking a representative sample of Americans what they think about crime and punishment, especially when we track their attitudes and opinions over time.

  9. Social Effects of Health Care Reform

    Do public health policy interventions result in prosocial behaviors? The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansions were responsible for the largest gains in public insurance coverage since its inception in 1965. These gains were concentrated in states that opted to expand Medicaid eligibility, and they provide a unique opportunity to study not just medical but also social consequences of increased public health coverage. The authors examine the association between Medicaid and volunteer work.
  10. Do Asian Americans Face Labor Market Discrimination? Accounting for the Cost of Living among Native-born Men and Women

    Being nonwhite, Asian Americans are an important case in understanding racial/ethnic inequality. Prior research has focused on native-born workers to reduce unobserved heterogeneity associated with immigrants. Native-born Asian American adults are concentrated, however, in areas with a high cost of living where wages tend to be higher. Regional location is thus said to inflate the wages of Asians. Given that many labor markets are national in scope with regional migration being common, current place of residence is unlikely to be a fully exogenous independent variable.