American Sociological Association

Search

Search

The search found 139 results in 0.029 seconds.

Search results

  1. Protest Campaigns and Movement Success: Desegregating the U.S. South in the Early 1960s

    Can protest bring about social change? Although scholarship on the consequences of social movements has grown dramatically, our understanding of protest influence is limited; several recent studies have failed to detect any positive effect. We investigate sit-in protest by black college students in the U.S. South in 1960, which targeted segregated lunch counters.

  2. It’s Better to be Angry Together

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 4, Page 52-59, Fall 2017.
  3. From Ferguson to France

    Jean Beaman compares the conditions that led to 2005 uprisings in French banlieues and 2014 protests in cities across the U.S.

  4. Ferguson and “Rapid-Response” Teaching

    Christopher Todd Beer on bringing current events into the classroom without relying on the whims of a news cycle.

  5. A Fracking Fracas Demonstrates Movement Potential

    A social movement against fracking is scoring victories in some states but not others. Why are some groups finding more success?

  6. RaceBaitR Talks #HistoryByHillary, Queerness

    Steven W. Thrasher and genderqueer activist Hari Ziyad on calling out hypocrisy and fighting racism without engaging racists.

  7. Weiners Galore

    Contexts, Volume 15, Issue 4, Page 67-69, Fall 2016.
  8. The Deliberate Racism Making #Gaymediasowhite

    Once cloaked in non-descript brown wrappers and confined to back-alley magazine stores, gay media is now ubiquitous.

  9. The Organizational Trace of an Insurgent Moment

    The relationship between social movements and formal organizations has long been a concern to scholars of collective action. Many have argued that social movement organizations (SMOs) provide resources that facilitate movement emergence, while others have highlighted the ways in which SMOs institutionalize or coopt movement goals.
  10. How Movies with a Female Presence Fare with Critics

    This study explores one potential mechanism contributing to the persistent underrepresentation of women in film by considering whether movie critics reward or penalize films with an independent female presence. Drawing on a sample of widely distributed movies from 2000 to 2009 (n = 975), we test whether films that pass the Bechdel Test (two or more named women speak to each other about something other than a man) have higher or lower Metacritic scores net of control variables, including arthouse production label, genre, production budget, including a top star, and being a sequel.