American Sociological Association

Search

Search

The search found 121 results in 0.02 seconds.

Search results

  1. Symposium: The Uses of Census Data

    John R. Logan, "Relying on the Census in Urban Social Science" with responses from: Robert M. Adelman, "Going Small: Urban Social Science in the Era of Big Data City & Community Forum on Census Data"; Samantha Friedman, "Census Data and its Use in the Study of Residential Inequality" and Karyn Lacy, "Problems, Puzzles, and the Production of Knowledge: Harnessing Census Data in the Age of Trump"

  2. The Relevance of Organizational Sociology

    Brayden G. King reviews Manufacturing Morals: The Values of Silence in Business School Education by Michel Anteby, Hyper-Organization: Global Organizational Expansion by Patricia Bromley and John W. Meyer, The Vanishing American Corporation: Navigating the Hazards of a New Economy by Gerald F. Davis and The Fracturing of the American Corporate Elite by Mark S. Mizruchi. 

  3. Rethinking Crime and Immigration

    The summer of 2007 witnessed a perfect storm of controversy over immigration to the United States. After building for months with angry debate, a widely touted immigration reform bill supported by President George W. Bush and many leaders in Congress failed decisively. Recriminations soon followed across the political spectrum.

  4. Terror, Terrorism, Terrorists

    The terms terror, terrorism, and terrorist do not identify causally coherent and distinct social phenomena but strategies that recur across a wide variety of actors and political situations. Social scientists who reify the terms confuse themselves and render a disservice to public discussion. The U.S. government's own catalogs of terrorist events actually support both claims.

  5. “My Deputies Arrest Anyone Who Breaks the Law”: Understanding How Color-blind Discourse and Reasonable Suspicion Facilitate Racist Policing

    In 2010, Arizona passed Senate Bill 1070. Although the Department of Justice has since deflated some of the racist tones contained within the bill, it set into motion several similar bills in other states. The author argues that this bill represents state-level color-blind racial ideology and facilitates white supremacy at the macro (state) and meso (police institutions) levels.
  6. Status Threat, Material Interests, and the 2016 Presidential Vote

    The April 2018 article of Diana Mutz “Status Threat, Not Economic Hardship, Explains the 2016 Presidential Vote,” was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and contradicts prior sociological research on the 2016 election. Mutz’s article received widespread media coverage because of the strength of its primary conclusion, declaimed in its title. The present article is a critical reanalysis of the models offered by Mutz, using the data files released along with her article.
  7. Racial Expropriation in Higher Education: Are Whiter Hispanic Serving Institutions More Likely to Receive Minority Serving Institution Funds?

    Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) are colleges with 25 percent or higher Latinx student bodies. Categorization as HSI permits institutions to apply for restricted competitive federal grants that are meant to help alleviate Latinx educational inequalities. However, HSI designations have increased fivefold over recent decades, leading to greater competition between them for these racially designated resources. This is the first known study to investigate patterns of racialized resource allocation to this subset of colleges.
  8. What Majority-minority Society? A Critical Analysis of the Census Bureau’s Projections of America’s Demographic Future

    On the basis of demographic projections by the U.S. Census Bureau, many Americans believe that their society will transition soon to a majority-minority one. The author analyzes the latest version of the projections and finds that the pivotal group is made up of individuals who come from mixed minority-white family backgrounds. It is projected to grow very rapidly in coming decades, and Census Bureau classification practices mean that most of its members are counted as minority. Without this classification, however, the emergence of a majority-minority society by 2060 is far from certain.
  9. It’s Only Wrong If It’s Transactional: Moral Perceptions of Obfuscated Exchange

    A wide class of economic exchanges, such as bribery and compensated adoption, are considered morally disreputable precisely because they are seen as economic exchanges. However, parties to these exchanges can structurally obfuscate them by arranging the transfers so as to obscure that a disreputable exchange is occurring at all.
  10. The Social Ecology of Speculation: Community Organization and Non-occupancy Investment in the U.S. Housing Bubble

    The housing boom of the mid-2000s saw the widespread popularization of non-occupant housing investment as an entrepreneurial activity within U.S. capitalism. In 2005, approximately one sixth of all mortgage-financed home purchases in the United States were for investment purposes. This article develops a sociological account that links the geographic distribution of popular investment to the social and institutional organization of communities.