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  1. Doing Diagnosis: Autism, Interaction Order, and the Use of Narrative in Clinical Talk

    This study, with an eye toward the social psychology of diagnosis more generally, is an investigation of how clinicians diagnose children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Responding to Hacking’s call for a Goffmanian mode of analysis to complement and balance the emphasis on large-scale transformations and discourses, we examine the narrative way in which clinicians provide evidence to support a diagnostic position.
  2. Chains of Power and Their Representation

    Power is the ability to send and bind someone else to act on one’s behalf, a relation that depends upon habits of interpretation. For persons attempting to complete projects, power involves communicating with, recruiting, and controlling subordinates and confronting those who are not in such a relationship of recruitment. This leads to a basic theoretical vocabulary about power players and their projects—a model of rector, actor, and other. As multiple relations of sending and binding become mutually implicated, chains of power—understood as simultaneously social and symbolic—emerge.
  3. A 200-Year Weight Debate

    Amanda M. Czerniawski charts two centuries of height and weight’s actuarial ideals.

  4. Marketing Manhood in a “Post-Feminist” Age

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 2, Page 38-43, Spring 2017.
  5. Title IX at XLV

    Defending takes priority over celebrating Title IX as a landmark legislation in essays from Shehzad Nadeem, Cheryl Cooky, Ellen J. Staurowsky, Nicole M. LaVoi, and Erin Buzuvis.
  6. Fields of Mutual Alignment: A Dual-Order Approach to the Study of Cultural Holes

    In this article, I discuss how network-analytic exploitations of the duality of agents and social object enable the study of fields from two analytical vantage points. Such an approach entails: (1) the discovery of field positions through identification of cultural holes within a network of agents’ tastes and (2) the measurement of interobject competition to identify social objects contributing most to the organization of field positions. Characterizing this approach as a mutual-alignment framework, I discuss its analytical advantages.
  7. Indians and Cowboys and Everyone Else

    Musician Sunny Jain and his band, Red Baraat, are fusing cultures and influences to form a rowdy revolution. Journalist Eamon Whalen interviews Jain about his role as bandleader, politics and spirituality, and imagining a new American “cowboy.”

  8. Rules without Referees

    By engaging in activities that push us to self-regulate around high ideals of model behavior–including ultimate frisbee–we may decrease the need for outside enforcement of the rules.

  9. Exploring Nightlife and Urban Change in Bairro Alto, Lisbon

    Over the last three decades culture has played a central role in the urban renewal of many cities worldwide. The inner city has thus become a socially, politically controlled “theatre of consumption” (Ritzer 2010). Correspondingly, the urban night has emerged not only as a significant space–time of productive economic activity but also as a key strategy in the urban regeneration of downtowns (Chatterton and Hollands 2003; Farrer 2008, 2011; Hae 2011, 2012; Tadié and Permanadeli 2015; among others).

  10. Seeing Like the Fed: Culture, Cognition, and Framing in the Failure to Anticipate the Financial Crisis of 2008

    Seeing Like the Fed: Culture, Cognition, and Framing in the Failure to Anticipate the Financial Crisis of 2008