American Sociological Association

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  1. ASA Fights Against Adding Citizenship Question to Census

    The Trump Administration has announced that a question on citizenship status will be included on the 2020 Census.  This will fundamentally compromise the integrity of the census. 

  2. Spring 2018 Contexts Online Free until July 15

    Letter from the Editors

    Education is a central feature of our lives. Collectively, our society invests billions of dollars in schools and colleges, with the hope that they act as transformative institutions that create a society of educated and productive citizens. Most of us will spend 12 to 16 years in school—often many more. And if we have children, we obsess over their homework, their schools’ scorecards, and the doors education will open for each generation.

  3. Summer Contexts Online Free until August 31

    From the Editors

    Resistance can be thought of as a broad range of active actions against the status quo, often aiming to do what is morally right even if it opposes laws or mores. Resistance is fighting for people to see your humanity. Resistance is speaking up and speaking out, pushing forward even if you know the consequences could be grave—the loss of a job, a friend, or your life. You resist.

  4. A Haunted Generation Remembers

    by Shruti Devgan

    Second-generation Sikhs grew up with fragments and half-told stories of the anti-Sikh violence of 1984, but it is not just direct descendants of survivors who “remember” traumatic experiences. Sikhs’ collectivist orientation, cultural traditions and diasporic location offer new insights into understanding intergenerational trauma and memory work.

  5. Disrupting the Racial Wealth Gap

    by Melvin L. Oliver and Thomas M. Shapiro

    Toxic levels of wealth inequality in the United States broke into public awareness on the heels of the Occupy Wall Street Movement in 2011. Some academics and social justice advocates had tried for years to elevate wealth inequality to the public square, but it took a social movement that started in Manhattan for people to take notice. Despite the movement’s focus on social class, race—the racial wealth gap, in particular—was notably absent as wealth inequality became a public conversation.

  6. Spring 2019 Contexts Online Free until July 5

    From the Editors

    Special Issue on Migration

    Close your eyes. Imagine a world where it is just as easy to move from Mexico to California as it is from Philadelphia to New York. Imagine a world where you don’t have to wait years for a visa, pay thousands of dollars in fees, and prove you aren’t a criminal, just to get a job waiting tables. Imagine a world where families aren’t separated by government immigration agents and no one is deported.