American Sociological Association

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  1. After Moving to Opportunity: How Moving to a Low-poverty Neighborhood Improves Mental Health among African American Women

    A large body of nonexperimental literature finds residing in a disadvantaged neighborhood is deleterious for mental health, and recent evidence from the Moving to Opportunity (MTO) program—a social experiment giving families living in high-poverty neighborhoods the opportunity to move to low-poverty neighborhoods—suggests a causal effect of moving to a low-poverty neighborhood on adult mental health. We use qualitative data from 67 Baltimore adults who signed up for the MTO program to understand how moving to a low-poverty neighborhood produced these mental health benefits.

  2. Stealing a Bag of Potato Chips and Other Crimes of Resistance

    Sociologist Victor M. Rios shows in his study how some young men make trouble as means of gaining respect. This excerpt is an adaptation from his book Punished: Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys.

  3. Religion and Sexual Behaviors: Understanding the Influence of Islamic Cultures and Religious Affiliation for Explaining Sex Outside of Marriage

    Social scientists have long been interested in how cultural and structural characteristics shape individuals’ actions. We investigate this relationship by examining how macro- and micro-level religious effects shape individuals’ reports of premarital and extramarital sex. We look at how identifying with one of the major world religions—Islam, Hinduism, Christianity, Buddhism, or Judaism—and living in a nation with a Muslim culture shape the likelihood of sex outside of marriage.

  4. Americans’ Perceptions of Transgender People’s Sex: Evidence from a National Survey Experiment

    Drawing on the first national survey experiment of its kind (n = 3,922), the authors examine Americans’ perceptions of transgender people’s sex and the factors that underlie these perceptions. The authors randomly assigned respondents to a vignette condition describing a transgender person whose self-identified gender (i.e., identifies as a man or a woman), age (i.e., adult or teenager), and gender conformity in physical appearance (i.e., conforming, nonconforming, ambiguous, or unspecified) had been experimentally manipulated.

  5. Light Privilege? Skin Tone Stratification in Health among African Americans

    Skin tone is a status characteristic used in society to evaluate and rank the social position of minorities. Although skin color represents a particularly salient dimension of race, its consequences for health remains unclear.

  6. Access to Higher Education of Afro-Peruvians: Disentangling the Influence of Skin Color and Social Origins in the Peruvian Stratification System

    Despite recent efforts by the Peruvian government to rectify centuries of injustice against Afro-Peruvians, not much is known about the relative influence of discrimination and social origins on Afro-Peruvians’ access to higher education. Using data from the 2014 Specialized Study of Afro-Peruvian Population and logistic regression, the authors examine the influence of skin color and social origins on access to higher education for Afro-Peruvians.

  7. Royall Must Fall: Old and New Battles on the Memory of Slavery in New England

    There is much scholarly and public debate over how slavery should be remembered, especially in the southern United States. We have seen this recently with the case of Charlottesville, Virginia, where protest ensued over a statue of Robert E. Lee. However, attention should also be paid to the history of slavery in the northern United States, particularly in places such as New England, where attempts were made to silence this history.

  8. Emergence of Third Spaces: Exploring Trans Students’ Campus Climate Perceptions Within Collegiate Environments

    Our study aims to understand trans students’ perceptions of campus climate, with a particular focus on students’ demographics, academic experiences, and cocurricular experiences. We use Bhabha’s concept of third space as an epistemological lens and Rankin and Reason’s transformational tapestry model as a theoretical framework. Using a national sample of 207 trans collegians from the National LGBTQ Alumnx Survey, we utilize regression analysis supplemented by an analysis of open-ended responses to highlight the experiences of trans respondents.

  9. The Enduring Mental Health Effects of Post-9/11 Discrimination in the Context of the Great Recession: Race/Ethnic Variation

    While prior study has linked discrimination experienced as a result of 9/11 with economic insecurity within the context of the Great Recession, the mental health effects of this linkage are unexamined. This study examined whether economic insecurity during the recession era helps account for long-term effects of 9/11-related discrimination on symptoms of depression and anxiety using structural equation modeling techniques to assess data from a national mail survey.

  10. Trends in U.S. Gender Attitudes, 1977 to 2018: Gender and Educational Disparities

    These figures display gender- and education-related gaps in U.S. gender attitudes from 1977 to 2018. The authors use data from the General Social Survey (N = 57,224) to estimate the historical trajectory of U.S. attitudes about women in politics, familial roles, and working motherhood. Of all attitudes analyzed, Americans hold the most liberal attitudes toward women in politics, with no gender gap and little educational difference on this issue. Attitudes toward familial roles have the largest educational gap but a small gender difference.