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  1. Searching for a Mate: The Rise of the Internet as a Social Intermediary

    This article explores how the efficiency of Internet search is changing the way Americans find romantic partners. We use a new data source, the How Couples Meet and Stay Together survey. Results show that for 60 years, family and grade school have been steadily declining in their influence over the dating market. In the past 15 years, the rise of the Internet has partly displaced not only family and school, but also neighborhood, friends, and the workplace as venues for meeting partners.

  2. Differential Returns?: Neighborhood Attainment among Hispanic and Non‐Hispanic White New Legal Permanent Residents

    We use data from the New Immigrant Survey to examine patterns of residential attainment among Hispanic immigrants who recently became legal permanent residents (LPRs) relative to new LPR non‐Hispanic white immigrants. We focus on whether these Hispanic and non‐Hispanic white immigrants differ in their ability to transform human capital into residential advantage. Our results suggest that the answer depends on the neighborhood attribute in question.

  3. Symposium: The Uses of Census Data

    John R. Logan, "Relying on the Census in Urban Social Science" with responses from: Robert M. Adelman, "Going Small: Urban Social Science in the Era of Big Data City & Community Forum on Census Data"; Samantha Friedman, "Census Data and its Use in the Study of Residential Inequality" and Karyn Lacy, "Problems, Puzzles, and the Production of Knowledge: Harnessing Census Data in the Age of Trump"

  4. White Integration or Segregation? The Racial and Ethnic Transformation of Rural and Small Town America

    Rural America has seemingly been “left behind” in an era of massive immigration and growing diversity. The arrival of new immigrants has exposed many rural whites, perhaps for the first time, to racial and ethnic minority populations. Do rural whites increasingly live in racially diverse nonmetropolitan places? Or is white exposure to racially diverse populations expressed in uneven patterns of residential integration from place to place? We link microdata from the Panel Survey of Income Dynamics (1989‐to‐2009 waves) to place data identified in the 1990–2010 decennial censuses.

  5. The Relevance of Organizational Sociology

    Brayden G. King reviews Manufacturing Morals: The Values of Silence in Business School Education by Michel Anteby, Hyper-Organization: Global Organizational Expansion by Patricia Bromley and John W. Meyer, The Vanishing American Corporation: Navigating the Hazards of a New Economy by Gerald F. Davis and The Fracturing of the American Corporate Elite by Mark S. Mizruchi. 

  6. Rethinking Crime and Immigration

    The summer of 2007 witnessed a perfect storm of controversy over immigration to the United States. After building for months with angry debate, a widely touted immigration reform bill supported by President George W. Bush and many leaders in Congress failed decisively. Recriminations soon followed across the political spectrum.

  7. Gender Gaps in Undergraduate Fields of Study: Do College Characteristics Matter?

    Despite gender parity in earned bachelor’s degrees, large gender gaps persist across fields of study. The dominant explanatory framework in this area of research assesses how gender differences in individual-level attributes predict gaps in major choice. The authors argue that individualistic accounts cannot provide a complete explanation because they fail to consider the powerful effects of the gendered institutional environments that inform and shape young men’s and women’s choices.
  8. Text Analysis with JSTOR Archives

    I provide a visual representation of keyword trends and authorship for two flagship sociology journals using data from JSTOR’s Data for Research repository. While text data have accompanied the digital spread of information, it remains inaccessible to researchers unfamiliar with the required preprocessing. The visualization and accompanying code encourage widespread use of this source of data in the social sciences.

  9. The Societalization of Social Problems: Church Pedophilia, Phone Hacking, and the Financial Crisis

    This article develops a theory of “societalization,” demonstrating its plausibility through empirical analyses of church pedophilia, media phone-hacking, and the financial crisis. Although these strains were endemic for decades, they had failed to generate broad crises. Reactions were confined inside institutional boundaries and handled by intra-institutional elites according to the cultural logics of their particular spheres. The theory proposes that boundaries between spheres can be breached only if there is code switching.
  10. Being a Transnational Korean Adoptee, Becoming Asian American

    The 2018 Winter Olympics saw Korean adoptees celebrated as global ambassadors bridging Korea and the U.S. Yet, in their daily lives, Korean adoptees often feel they are not quite full members of either country or culture. What does it mean for these adoptees to be inbetween, historically and contemporarily, and how do they fit into Asian America?