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  1. Problems Establishing Identity/Residency in a City Neighborhood during a Black/White Police‐Citizen Encounter: Reprising Du Bois’ Conception of Submission as “Submissive Civility”

    This article revisits W.E.B. Du Bois' (1943) conception of “The Submissive Man” in the context of a Black/White police‐citizen encounter. Du Bois argued that submission to democratic principles that place the well‐being of the whole over the individual is a Black American ideal, which offers a necessary counter‐balance to the individualism of the dominant White “Strong Man” ideal.

  2. Making Jerusalem “Cooler”: Creative Script, Youth Flight, and Diversity

    The creative city approach, already one of the most popular urban development models in recent years, continues to spread to new destinations. When urban scholars explain how ideas become canon, including the particular case of the creative city approach, they usually focus on political‐economic mechanisms, the role of global elite networks, and the interests of local economic growth coalitions.

  3. The Armenians of Glendale: An Ethnoburb in Los Angeles's San Fernando Valley

    Glendale may house the most visible Armenian diaspora in the world; however, it remains among the most invisible in print. The following begins to shed light on this community by providing a brief background and demographic profile of Armenians in Glendale. The article then attempts to expand discussions of Chinese “ethnoburbs” by situating Glendale Armenians in these discussions. Despite scholars’ expansion of the concept, the ethnoburb has had limited application—largely, to Chinese and a few other Asian immigrant communities.

  4. Against Teleology in the Study of Race: Toward the Abolition of the Progress Paradigm

    We argue that claims of racial progress rest upon untenable teleological assumptions founded in Enlightenment discourse. We examine the theoretical and methodological focus on progress and its historical roots. We argue research should examine the concrete mechanisms that produce racial stability and change, and we offer three alternative frameworks for interpreting longitudinal racial data and phenomena. The first sees racism as a “fundamental cause,” arguing that race remains a “master category” of social differentiation.
  5. Race and the Empire-state: Puerto Ricans’ Unequal U.S. Citizenship

    Contemporary theorizing regarding citizenship emphasizes the legal and social significance of citizenship status. Citizenship awards individuals a formal status and exclusive rights while also granting them membership into a national community. This study investigates tenets of liberal citizenship by examining the meaning of U.S. citizenship for Puerto Ricans. Drawing on 98 in-depth interviews with Puerto Ricans in Orlando, Florida, this study finds incongruences between theoretical understandings of citizenship and the experience of citizenship on the ground.
  6. U.S. Empire and the “Adaptive Education” Model: The Global Production of Race

    Following World War I, the U.S. Department of Labor worked with a large-scale commercial philanthropic endeavor called the Phelps Stokes Fund to transfer educational policies designed for African Americans to West Africa and South Africa. They specifically promoted the “adaptive education” model used at Tuskegee and the Hampton institutes for African American education. This model emphasized manual labor, Christian character formation, and political passivity as a form of racial uplift.
  7. “I’m Not Spanish, I’m from Spain”: Spaniards’ Bifurcated Ethnicity and the Boundaries of Whiteness and Hispanic Panethnic Identity

    This study counters potentially premature demographic and sociological claims of a large-scale Hispanic transition into mainstream whiteness. Via in-depth interviews and ethnographic observations of recently arrived Spanish immigrants in the United States, it presents a distinctive shift in American categorization logic, whereby race and ethnicity switch in order of everyday importance. Despite Spanish immigrants’ direct links to Europe and few structural social boundaries between them and mainstream U.S.
  8. 2018 Hans O. Mauksch Address: Service Sociology for a Better World: A Critical and Imperative Strategy for Teaching and Learning in Sociology

    Service sociology is a critical strategy for teaching and learning in sociology. Even beyond that, service sociology is an imperative for communicating the value of our discipline to our students and other constituents. Using data collected from faculty members in Minnesota colleges and universities, I describe the salience of the sociology literacy framework for service sociology and as a means to avoid some of the weaknesses associated with service learning as a general pedagogy in our discipline.
  9. Reconceptualizing Participation Grading as Skill Building

    Two common ways that instructors assess participation in sociology courses are recalling participation by memory or counting times spoken during class in real time. However, these common assessments rely on faulty assumptions that do not support their usage. This article reconceptualizes participation grading as an opportunity to motivate skill building across a variety of dimensions. The evidence from two classes of 45 and 47 students demonstrates that this conceptualization can be effectively implemented in undergraduate courses.
  10. Extra Credit in the Sociology Classroom

    The role of extra credit in the college classroom has been examined as a philosophical and pedagogical issue, but in this project, we argue that the matter of extra credit is also a sociological one. Using survey data, we examine how college instructors’ status and individual demographic characteristics are related to the use of extra credit. We found that women and instructors with less teaching experience are more likely to offer extra credit.