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  1. Race-Ethnicity, Poverty, Urban Stressors, and Telomere Length in a Detroit Community-based Sample

    Residents of distressed urban areas suffer early aging-related disease and excess mortality. Using a community-based participatory research approach in a collaboration between social researchers and cellular biologists, we collected a unique data set of 239 black, white, or Mexican adults from a stratified, multistage probability sample of three Detroit neighborhoods. We drew venous blood and measured telomere length (TL), an indicator of stress-mediated biological aging, linking respondents’ TL to their community survey responses.

  2. The Problem of Urban Sprawl

    Thomas Laidley on the causes and consequences of expanding cities.

  3. The Organizational Trace of an Insurgent Moment

    The relationship between social movements and formal organizations has long been a concern to scholars of collective action. Many have argued that social movement organizations (SMOs) provide resources that facilitate movement emergence, while others have highlighted the ways in which SMOs institutionalize or coopt movement goals.
  4. From Systems Thinking to Systemic Action: Social Vulnerability and the Institutional Challenge of Urban Resilience

    From Systems Thinking to Systemic Action: Social Vulnerability and the Institutional Challenge of Urban Resilience

  5. Wage Stagnation and Buyer Power: How Buyer-Supplier Relations Affect U.S. Workers’ Wages, 1978 to 2014

    Since the 1970s, market restructuring has shifted many workers into workplaces heavily reliant on sales to outside corporate buyers. These outside buyers wield substantial power over working conditions among their suppliers. During the same period, wage growth for middle-income workers stagnated. By extending organizational theories of wage-setting to incorporate interactions between organizations, I predict that wage stagnation resulted in part from production workers’ heightened exposure to buyer power.
  6. Mass Mobilization and the Durability of New Democracies

    The “elitist approach” to democratization contends that “democratic regimes that last have seldom, if ever, been instituted by mass popular actors” (Huntington 1984:212). This article subjects this observation to empirical scrutiny using statistical analyses of new democracies over the past half-century and a case study. Contrary to the elitist approach, I argue that new democracies growing out of mass mobilization are more likely to survive than are new democracies that were born amid quiescence.
  7. Like a Good Neighbor, Squatters Are There: Property and Neighborhood Stability in the Context of Urban Decline

    In declining cities, an abundance of vacant, devalued property, and under‐resourced regulatory mechanisms challenge dominant understandings of private ownership of real property as a source of investment and stability for individuals and neighborhoods. Drawing on four years of ethnography and 65 interviews in Detroit, this article finds that, despite the privileged standing of private property in U.S. culture, residents frequently accept or advocate for illegal property use, such as squatting or scrapping.

  8. Deception, Development, and Democracy

    Jacob Rugh on Christopher Mele’s Race and the Politics of Deception.
  9. Places in Need: The Changing Geography of Poverty

    In Places in Need, Scott Allard draws on census and administrative data combined with fieldwork and over 100 in‐depth interviews of suburban service providers to document the uneven safety net response to the suburbanization of poverty in the metropolitan United States. His geographic scope ranges across urban and suburban counties with considerable attention focused on suburban Chicago, Los Angeles, and Washington, DC.

  10. Performative Progressiveness: Accounting for New Forms of Inequality in the Gayborhood

    Attitudes toward homosexuality have liberalized considerably, but these positive public opinions conceal the persistence of prejudice at an interpersonal level. We use interviews with heterosexual residents of Chicago gayborhoods—urban districts that offer ample opportunities for contact and thus precisely the setting in which we would least expect bias to appear—to analyze this new form of inequality.