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  1. For-Profit Trade Schools Prove Costly for Disadvantaged Black Youth

    Young African-Americans from some of the country’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods are drawn to for-profit post-secondary trade schools, believing they are the quickest route to jobs. But a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University sociologist finds the very thing that makes for-profit schools seem so appealing — a streamlined curriculum — is the reason so many poor students drop out.

  2. Study Shows How a Community’s Culture and Social Connectedness Can Increase Suicide Risk

    Community characteristics play an important role in perpetuating teen suicide clusters and thwarting prevention efforts, according to a new study by sociologists at the University of Chicago (UChicago) and University of Memphis who examined clusters in a single town.

  3. Police Violence Against Unarmed Black Men Results in Loss of Thousands of Crime-Related 911 Calls

    A new study shows that publicized cases of police violence against unarmed black men have a clear and significant negative impact on citizen crime reporting, specifically 911 calls.   

  4. Taking Time-Off Work to Raise Children is Damaging to the Careers of Highly Skilled, High Earning Women

    Mothers who leave work to raise children often sacrifice more than the pay for their time off; when they come back their wages reflect lost raises, according to a new study by Paula England, Professor of Sociology at New York University.

  5. Access to health care strengthens communities: JHSB study

    A new Journal of Health and Social Behavior study shows that access to health insurance can help hold a community together socially, and lack of it can contribute to the fraying of neighborhood cohesion.

    The study, Beyond Health Effects? Examining the Social Consequences of Community Levels of Uninsurance Pre-ACA, published by the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, is an effort by researchers Tara McKay and Stefan Timmermans to “broaden the conversation” about the effects of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

  6. Contexts: Personal, Political

    Winter 2017 Vol. 16 No. 1

    Features include "Chump Change", "Living on the Fringe in Post-apartheid Cape Town", "Love Wins", "Could There Be a Silver Lining to Zika?", and "'Straight Girls Kissing' Beyond the Elite College Campus."

  7. Contexts Collection: On Aging

    A special electronic collection of articles from the Fall 2009 and Winter 2010 issues of Contexts on the topic of aging. Featuring Vincent J. Roscigno, Phyllis Moen, Eric Utne, Deborah Carr, Stacy Torres and the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on an Aging Society. 28 pages, March 2010.

  8. Contexts: Moving through Time and Space

    Summer 2015 Vol. 14 No. 3

    Sociology is all about putting people—their identities and their interactions—in social contexts. And those contexts are nested in the inescapable intersections of time and space.

  9. Contexts: Good News!

    Contexts
    Spring 2016 Vol. 15 No. 2

    Feature articles include "How to Do Ethnography Right," U.S. Attitudes toward Lesbian and Gay People are Better than Ever," "Social Mobility among Second-Generation Latinos," "Immigrant Rights are Civil Rights," "Transitioning Out Loud and Online," "Celebrating New Citizens, Defining the Nntion," and " A Hand Up for Low-Income Families."

  10. Sociologists to Explore the Topics of Culture, Inequalities, and Social Inclusion at Annual Meeting in Montreal, Aug. 12–15

    More than 5,500 sociologists will convene in Montreal this August to explore scientific research relating to social inequality and many other topics, as part of the American Sociological Association’s 112th Annual Meeting. This year’s theme, “Culture, Inequalities, and Social Inclusion across the Globe,” draws attention to the nexus of culture, inequalities, and group boundaries in order to promote greater social inclusion and resilience, collective well-being, and solidarity in Canada, the United States, and globally.