American Sociological Association

Search

The search found 155 results in 0.01 seconds.

Search results

  1. Pro-Environmental Views of Climate Skeptics

    by Kristin Haltinner and Dilshani Sarathchandra

    Nick was not always skeptical about human-caused climate change; for most of his life, he believed the science as presented in documentaries and on the news. Things began to change for Nick around 2014 when some of the predictions made in Al Gore’s Inconvenient Truth still hadn’t been realized. In Nick’s words: “You have Gore and other people who have said the ice caps should be melted by now… Clearly, that was wrong.”

  2. Understanding Recent Growth Dynamics in Small Urban Places: The Case of New England

    This article utilizes recently published US Census data covering the pre‐and post‐Great Recession period (1990–2015) to identify key determinants of growth among small urban places in the New England Region. We find little evidence of random growth and robust evidence of convergence in growth, indicating that smaller urban areas tend to experience faster rates of growth than larger ones, over both the short and long term. Factors such as distance to large city areas and amenities are found to be particularly relevant to population growth rates.

  3. Workplace Compensation Practices and the Rise in Benefit Inequality

    This article aims to explain why inequality in fringe benefits has grown faster than wage inequality over the past four decades. We depart from previous income inequality research by studying benefits in addition to wages, but also by focusing on workplaces as the main drivers of benefit determination. We advance the argument that benefits determination is more organizationally embedded than wages mainly because workplaces have greater ability and incentive to alter benefits.
  4. Supporting Sociologists Around the World During COVID-19


    The American Sociological Association (ASA) is concerned about the well-being of sociologists around the world as the COVID19 pandemic changes the course of daily life in fundamental ways.  We recognize that the nature of the challenges facing individual sociologists varies not only by personal conditions, but by the conditions of the country in which one resides. We support sociologists around the world as they make efforts to address this crisis through sociological research, and we express solidarity with our global sociological family interested in the well-being of humanity.

  5. Does Climate Protest Work? Partisanship, Protest, and Sentiment Pools

    This study demonstrates whether and how climate protest increases or decreases the “sentiment pools” available to the climate movement. Using an experimental vignette survey design (n = 1,421), the author finds that compared with a control condition, peaceful marches are effective for both independents and Democrats, while civil disobedience has a positive effect among Democrats. These effects are isolated to those who are most certain of anthropogenic climate change. No effect is observed among Republicans.
  6. Are Labor Market Institutions Countercyclical?

    The deregulatory perspective on labor market institutions argues that such institutions push up wage and employment costs while discouraging hiring and job seeking. In contrast, an institutionalist perspective argues that labor market institutions support deeper skill formation and better job searches. Building on this literature, the authors focus on temporal variation, emphasizing that some labor market institutions are likely countercyclical: they can potentially limit job losses in economic downturns.
  7. Job Pressure, the Work-Family Interface, and the Sense of Distributive Injustice: An Elaboration of Work-Related Inputs among Twenty-First Century Workers

    Research in social psychology demonstrates that the sense of distributive injustice has emotional, health, and behavioral consequences. It is therefore important to assess how individuals come to perceive their earnings as unjust. I provide new insights to this question by integrating perspectives in distributive justice, the stress process, and the work-family interface. Specifically, I describe a model that delineates how excessive work pressures elevate workers’ sense of what they should earn through actions and strains in the work-family interface.
  8. A Call to Higher Education Administrators Regarding Student Educational Progress During COVID-19

    The COVID-19 global pandemic has created unprecedented challenges for higher education. Institutions are faced with difficult decisions about how best to continue serving their educational and research missions, while also protecting individual and public health. Institutions moved at exceptional speed to close their campuses and move all instruction online.

  9. Ethics and Black Lives Matter Research

    As Black Lives Matter protests are ongoing in the United States and around the world, numerous sociologists are viewing these protests not only as opportunities to push for social change, but also as opportunities to better understand how social movements work. This is especially true for sociologists studying Collective Behavior and Social Movements. Given the emergent nature of these protests, some sociology faculty members working with students on collective action research may rely on students to collect data at these protests.

  10. Sociologists Available to Discuss Education and Schools During the Pandemic

    Contact: Johanna Olexy, ASA Director of Communications, at (202) 247-9873, communications@asanet.org