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  1. Traveling across Racial Borders: TripAdvisor and the Discursive Strategies Businesses Use to Deny Racism

    Travel and leisure activities can bring many rewards, and yet for those deemed “racialized Others,” these same activities can be fraught with anxiety and tension. As in all aspects of society, racism mediates the rewards of travel and leisure. Decisions about when and how to confront racism are central in the lives of those considered racialized Others. Given a wish to de-escalate racist situations and respond later, some individuals are using online platforms to call out racism.
  2. Black-White Differences in the Relationship between Parental Income and Depression in Young Adulthood: The Different Roles of Family Support and College Enrollment among U.S. Adolescents

    This study uses the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health to examine racially patterned mechanisms linking parental income and early adult depression, focusing on the mediating roles of family support and college enrollment. Findings suggest two noteworthy Black-White differences. First, parental income is positively correlated with depression for Black adolescents through family support. This is because high parental income tends to decrease family support for Black adolescents, a pattern not replicated for White adolescents.
  3. Complaint-Oriented Policing: Regulating Homelessness in Public Space

    Over the past 30 years, cities across the United States have adopted quality-of-life ordinances aimed at policing social marginality. Scholars have documented zero-tolerance policing and emerging tactics of therapeutic policing in these efforts, but little attention has been paid to 911 calls and forms of third-party policing in governing public space and the poor.
  4. The Sociology of Gaslighting

    Gaslighting—a type of psychological abuse aimed at making victims seem or feel “crazy,” creating a “surreal” interpersonal environment—has captured public attention. Despite the popularity of the term, sociologists have ignored gaslighting, leaving it to be theorized by psychologists. However, this article argues that gaslighting is primarily a sociological rather than a psychological phenomenon. Gaslighting should be understood as rooted in social inequalities, including gender, and executed in power-laden intimate relationships.
  5. “Chocolate City, Rest in Peace”: White Space‐Claiming and the Exclusion of Black People in Washington, DC

    Urban sociologists and gentrification scholars have long been interested in examining the combination of structural and micro‐level forces that result in the displacement and exclusion of low‐income residents from changing neighborhoods. However, the types of everyday activities and the social and spatial practices that exclude residents who remain in these neighborhoods are an understudied part of the gentrification story. How are exclusive spaces created? What are the specific social processes that lead to exclusive space?

  6. Complaining While Black: Racial Disparities in the Adjudication of Complaints Against the Police

    Reports of citizen complaints of police misconduct often note that officers are rarely disciplined for alleged misconduct. The perception of little officer accountability contributes to widespread distrust of law enforcement in communities of color. This project investigates how race and segregation shape the outcomes of allegations made against the Chicago Police Department (CPD) between 2011 and 2014. We find that complaints by black and Latino citizens and against white officers are less likely to be sustained.

  7. American Sociological Association Statement on Wake Forest Attacks

    We stand in solidarity with our colleagues at Wake Forest University who are under attack for their research and for their commitment to diversity and inclusion.
     
    These attacks are targeting sociologists for their leadership in anti-racist demonstrations and for their research into the sale of enslaved people that funded the school’s endowment.  Members of the sociology community from historically marginalized populations, including people of color and members of the LGBTQ community, are being singled out for attack. 
     

  8. Review Essay: The Digital Surveillance Society

    When hundreds of thousands of protesters filled the streets of Hong Kong this summer, central figures reportedly took no selfies, avoided Facebook and Twitter, installed prepaid SIM cards, stuck to secure messaging apps, and used cash instead of rechargeable subway cards or other cashless payments. It is not clear whether this will help them avoid “conspiracy to commit public nuisance” charges, which led to prison sentences for leaders of the 2014 Umbrella movement (including sociologist Kin-man Chan).
  9. Combating White Supremacy: A Sociological Perspective on Current Events

    Contact: Naomi Paiss, Communications Director, at (202) 247-9859, npaiss@asanet.org; Johanna Olexy, Senior Communications Associate, at (202) 247-9873, communications@asanet.org,.

  10. Love Me Tinder, Love Me Sweet

    Are “hook up” apps leading to a new kind of dating culture on college campuses? Dating apps like Tinder and Bumble are have a different impact on the lives of college students versus older daters. Many students are using these apps to circumvent the romantic gatekeeping that campus party culture has long dominated.