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  1. Symbolic Politics of the State: The Case of In-state Tuition Bills for Undocumented Students

    A symbolic politics approach contends that the meanings policy proposals convey, and the audiences they attract, may matter more than whether they become law. Yet, we know little about the sociopolitical conditions prompting lawmakers to engage in symbolic politics.

  2. Bar Fights on the Bowery

    http://ctx.sagepub.com/content/14/3/20.abstract

  3. How Grassroots Groups Lose Political Imagination

    http://ctx.sagepub.com/content/14/1/32.abstract

  4. Measuring College Learning in Sociology: SSRC and ASA Collaboration Reaches Milestone

    Book CoverIn 2013 the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) initiated the Measuring College Learning (MCL) project because SSRC recognized a pressing need for greater clarity, intentionality, and quality in U.S. higher education.

  5. What Is Relational Structure? Introducing History to the Debates on the Relation between Fields and Social Networks

    In this article, I argue that the current views on the relation between fields and social networks are based on two false premises: first, that fields and social networks are mutually exclusive forms of relational structure, and second, that the objective form of relational structure is an a priori fact.

  6. ASA Applauds Supreme Court’s Ruling to Uphold Affirmative Action Program at University of Texas

    The American Sociological Association (ASA) applauds the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling today in the affirmative action case Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin. The judgement allows the university to continue using race as a factor in admissions decisions.

  7. The Origins of Race-conscious Affirmative Action in Undergraduate Admissions: A Comparative Analysis of Institutional Change in Higher Education

    What explains the rise of race-conscious affirmative action policies in undergraduate admissions? The dominant theory posits that adoption of such policies was precipitated by urban and campus unrest in the North during the late 1960s. Based on primary research in a sample of 17 selective schools, we find limited support for the dominant theory. Affirmative action arose in two distinct waves during the 1960s. A first wave was launched in the early 1960s by northern college administrators inspired by nonviolent civil rights protests in the South.

  8. Tactical Innovation in Social Movements: The Effects of Peripheral and Multi-Issue Protest

    Social movement researchers argue that tactical innovation occurs as a response to changes external to movements, such as police repression and shifts in political authority, or is due to internal movement processes, such as the characteristics of movement organizations and actors. In this study, we locate the roots of tactical innovation in the multiplicity of movement claims articulated at protest events.

  9. An Overview of Social Protest in Mexico

    By Sergio Tamayo, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco

  10. Doing Sociology: Jose Calderon

    ASA speaks with retired sociologist Jose Calderon at the 2016 ASA Annual Meeting on August, 2016, in Seattle, WA. Calderon talks about what it means to “do sociology,” how he uses sociology in his work, highlights of his work in the field, the relevance of sociological work to society, and his advice to students interested in entering the field.