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  1. Study Suggests Sex in Later Years Harmful to Men’s Heart Health, But Not Women’s

    Having sex frequently — and enjoying it — puts older men at higher risk for heart attacks and other cardiovascular problems. For older women, however, good sex may actually lower the risk of hypertension.

    That’s according to the first large-scale study of how sex affects heart health in later life. The federally funded research, led by a Michigan State University (MSU) scholar, appears in the September issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

  2. Going Underground: The Origins of Divergent Forms of Labor Parties in Recently Democratized Countries

    This study explores how different forms of civic solidarity emerge during authoritarian eras and how they evolve into diverse labor-based political institutions after transitions to democracy. I initially explore the modes of choices that radical intellectuals make—go underground or cooperate—in their responses to coercion and co-optation by authoritarian elites.

  3. ASA Continues to Respond to the Changing Climate for Sociologists in America

    ASA has a long and ongoing history of activity supporting diversity, inclusion, free inquiry, and academic freedom.  The need for such activity has escalated in recent weeks in deeply troubling ways, with developments ranging from a rash of racist, xenophobic, and other forms of discriminatory activities on campuses across the nation to the introduction of the Professor Watchlist which

  4. Traditional, Modern, and Post-Secular Perspectives on Science and Religion in the United States

    Using General Social Survey data, we examine perspectives on science and religion in the United States. Latent class analysis reveals three groups based on knowledge and attitudes about science, religiosity, and preferences for certain religious interpretations of the world. The traditional perspective (43 percent) is marked by a preference for religion compared to science; the modern perspective (36 percent) holds the opposite view. A third perspective, which we call post-secular (21 percent), views both science and religion favorably.

  5. Is a “Warm Hookup” an Oxymoron?

    In a review of Lisa Wade’s American Hookup (W.W. Norton, 2017), sexuality scholar and former American Sociological Association president Paula England discusses the author’s use of original research and data from England’s studies to engage the particularities of heterosexual hookups on American college campuses.

  6. “Straight Girls Kissing” Beyond the Elite Campus

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 42-47, Winter 2016.
  7. What’s So Cultural about Hookup Culture?

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 66-68, Winter 2016.
  8. Sociological Insights for Development Policy

    The Sociology of Development Section announces a new policy brief series: Sociological Insights for Development Policy. The purpose of the series is not only to raise awareness of the thought-provoking research being done by members of the section, but also to strengthen engagement between scholars, policy makers and development practitioners. The long-term aim is to enhance sociology’s impact on development discourse and practice throughout the world. Sociological Insights for Development Policy publish short (2-page) briefs that are distilled from section members’ research.

  9. Review Essays: Unwarranted Allegations in Unwanted Advances: On Laura Kipnis’s Attack on Title IX

    Long before writing her latest book—Unwanted Advances: Sexual Paranoia Comes to Campus—Northwestern University professor Laura Kipnis made a name for herself as a provocateur known for exposing hypocrisy with humor. Her previous books have been delightfully stinging with a keen eye toward irony and unseen contradictions: politically incorrect in ways that leave the reader tickled. Uncomfortable, but fun.
  10. Featured Essay: The Arrival of Social Science Genomics

    “The genetics revolution may be well underway,” write Dalton Conley and Jason Fletcher in The Genome Factor, “but the social genomics revolution is just getting started” (p. 11). They are not alone in their excitement for recent developments bringing together social science and genetic research. Decades from now, folks may well look back at this time as the start of a golden age for the field.