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  1. Men in Caring Occupations: Doing Gender Differently

    As there is less written about men in occupations where the majority of workers are women than the reverse, I was looking forward to reading Men in Caring Occupations, especially regarding the four occupations covered—airplane cabin crew, nurses, primary school teachers, and librarians. The focus of the book is how men “negotiate the potential mismatch between the (feminine) nature of the job and a gendered (masculine) identity” (p. 4-5). As the minority group in these occupations, men need to practice their caring skills, but need not feminize as workers.

  2. After Charlottesville: A Contexts Symposium

    In a joint editorial effort, the editors of Contexts have assembled a group of writers who specialize in research on race, racism, whiteness, nationalism, and immigration to provide sociological insights about how the public, politicians, and academics should process and understand the broader sociohistorical implications of the events in Charlottesville.

  3. Understanding Feminist Activism among Women: Resources, Consciousness, and Social Networks

    This study examines whether women’s feminist activism is connected to three key factors: sufficient educational and financial resources, the internalization of a feminist consciousness, and being involved in feminist mobilization structures. Analysis of the 2012 American National Election Survey (N = 1,876) suggests that participation and engagement in the women’s movement is least common among less educated women and stay-at-home mothers.
  4. In Whom Do We Trust? Racial Trust in the Early Years of Barack Obama’s Presidency

    For many African Americans, Barack Obama’s presidential victory in 2008 was a step toward a racially tolerant society. Yet for others, the attack on Obama’s religious faith and citizenship status reflected long-standing racial divisions within the electorate. Using ordered probit analyses, our study focuses on racial trust and social capital in the early years of Obama’s presidency. In assessing the relationship between Obama’s domestic policies and racial trust, our study closely aligns with the research on policy feedbacks.
  5. No Rest for the Weary: The Weight of Race, Gender, and Place inside and outside a Southern Classroom

    No Rest for the Weary: The Weight of Race, Gender, and Place inside and outside a Southern Classroom
  6. Activating Politics with Poetry and Spoken Word

    Millennial activism, so often maligned, finds new purchase in a revival of spoken word poetry as an adaptable advocacy, organizing, and mobilizing tool.

  7. Black Lives and Police Tactics Matter

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 3, Page 20-25, Summer 2017.
  8. I’ve Got My Family and My Faith: Black Women and the Suicide Paradox

    Although existing suicide literature proposes black women’s strong religious ties and social networks protect them against suicide, few studies offer black women’s perceptions. The present study examines the factors black women perceive of as protective against suicide by conducting in-depth semi-structured interviews with 33 U.S.-born black women. Results support current suicide literature on the role of social networks and religion in black women’s lives. The results also identify two important factors researchers continue to overlook.
  9. Book Review: Ways of Social Change: Making Sense of Modern Times, 2nd ed.

    Garth Massey’s Ways of Social Change is an academic reader for lower-level undergraduate courses that cover the topic of social change. Using a narrative format that at times resembles nonfiction, Massey creatively structures the nine chapters of the text around Robert Merton’s model of the “social mechanisms” of change. This second edition draws from a broad array of recent historical events as examples, such as the Arab Spring, and focuses on recent changes occurring as a result of globalization and technological advancements.