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  1. Latina/o or Mexicana/o? The Relationship between Socially Assigned Race and Experiences with Discrimination

    Discrimination based on one’s racial or ethnic background is one of the oldest and most perverse practices in the United States. Although much research has relied on self-reported racial categories, a growing body of research is designed to measure race through socially assigned race. Socially assigned or ascribed race measures how individuals feel they are classified by other people.

  2. "Oil and Water"? Latino-white Relations and Symbolic Integration in a Changing California

    Existing research on race relations between racial/ethnic groups in the United States highlights how personal contact can lead to increased harmony or conflict between groups and may reduce intergroup prejudice. This study engages this literature and draws from more than 20 months of ethnography and 66 interviews in a Spanish/English dual-language school in Los Angeles to qualitatively examine Latino-white relations in diverse settings.

  3. Does the Race of the Discrimination Agent in Latinos Discrimination Experiences Influence Latino Group Identity?

    Discrimination experiences are among the dominant conditions that define racial and ethnic populations in the United States. Although scholars in the social sciences have investigated the relationship between racial discrimination and various outcomes, less is known about how the sources of discrimination may vary within populations. Most studies and theories driving those studies assume that racial and ethnic minorities are being discriminated against by members of the dominant group.

  4. Part-Latinos and Racial Reporting in the Census: An Issue of Question Format?

    In this study, the author examines the racial reporting decisions of the offspring of Latino/non-Latino white, black, and Asian intermarriages, focusing on the meanings associated with their racial responses in the 2010 census and their thoughts on the separate race and Hispanic origin question format. Through interviews with 50 part-Latinos from New York, the findings demonstrated that their racial responses were shaped largely by question design, often due to the lack of Hispanic origins in the race question.

  5. Can We Finish the Revolution? Gender, Work-Family Ideals, and Institutional Constraint

    Why has progress toward gender equality in the workplace and at home stalled in recent decades? A growing body of scholarship suggests that persistently gendered workplace norms and policies limit men’s and women’s ability to create gender egalitarian relationships at home. In this article, we build on and extend prior research by examining the extent to which institutional constraints, including workplace policies, affect young, unmarried men’s and women’s preferences for their future work-family arrangements. We also examine how these effects vary across education levels.

  6. Latina/o Students in Majority White Schools

    Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, Volume 3, Issue 1, Page 113-125, January 2017.
  7. Strategies Men Use to Negotiate Family and Science

    Elaine Howard Ecklund, Sarah Damaske, Anne E. Lincoln, Virginia Johnston White
  8. Review Essays: On the Line: Latino Life in New Immigrant Destinations after 2005

    Two years—2005 and 2006—were critical for Latino immigrants living in “new destinations” across the U.S. South. A substantial body of literature documents whites and blacks reacting to Latino newcomers warmly or paternalistically (at best) to neutrally or ambivalently or occasionally negatively (at worst) in the two decades prior.
  9. The Neighborhood Context of Latino Threat

    In recent years, the size of the Latino immigrant population has swelled in communities throughout the United States. For decades, social scientists have studied how social context, particularly a minority group’s relative size, affects the sentiments of the dominant group. Using a random sample survey of five communities in suburban Chicago, the authors examine the impact of Latino population concentration on native-born white residents’ subjective perceptions of threat from Latino immigrants at two micro-level geographies: the immediate block and the surrounding blocks.
  10. Managing the “Dirty Work” of Illegality

    Drawing on in-depth interviews with 45 Latinos living in a small city the author calls Sycamore City, the author examines the discourses and practices through which Mexican migrants and Puerto Ricans deal with the “dirty work” of illegality. The focus is on the “physical dirty work” performed by undocumented workers and “social dirty work” performed by workers on the margins of citizenship. This research shows that “physical dirty work” and “social dirty work” overlap when a new class of worker enters the labor market.