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  1. Urbanscapes of Disaster: The Sociopolitical and Spatial Processes Underpinning Vulnerability within a Slum in Mexico

    Urbanscapes of disaster are socially and environmentally constituted. Drawing upon the theoretical framework of social vulnerability to disasters, the concept of urbanscape is enriched and empirically verified. This paper highlights how urban social hazards are more relevant for vulnerable people than the risk of experiencing the negative effects of extreme natural events. The analysis of floods in a slum located in a Mexican city reveals intricate socioenvironmental conditions underpinning a disaster process.

  2. Why is Helping Behavior Declining in the United States But Not in Canada?: Ethnic Diversity, New Technologies, and Other Explanations

    This paper explores whether there has been a recent decline in helping behavior in the United States. In a lost letter experiment, 7,466 letters were “lost” in 63 urban areas in the United States and Canada in 2001 and 2011. There has been a 10 percent decline in helping behavior in the United States, but not in Canada. Two arguments anticipate change in the level of help provided to strangers: the rise of new technologies, and neighborhood racial and ethnic diversity. Findings exclude increased privatism as a source for the decline in helping.

  3. Housing Choices as School Choices: Subsidized Renters’ Agency in an Uncertain Policy Context

    Previous scholarship on the federal Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program has found that HCV renters are less likely than other households living below the poverty line to live in neighborhoods with high-performing schools. These findings are troubling because HCV renters have some choice about where they live, yet aggregate data linking HCV renters’ neighborhoods with school performance shows that renters tend to be concentrated in impoverished areas with poor schools.

  4. The Politics of World Polity: Script-writing in International Organizations

    American Sociological Review, Volume 82, Issue 5, Page 1065-1092, October 2017.
  5. Not a Snowball’s Chance for Science

    Using climate change denial as a case, the authors demonstrate how echo chambers are formed and reinscribed to limit information within bounded networks.

  6. Immigrant Rights are Civil Rights

    Black-brown coalition activism is changing hearts, minds, and legislation in Missouri and across the American South.

  7. Celebrating New Citizens, Defining the Nation

    Exploring naturalization ceremonies as sites of Durkheimian ritual, creating social solidarity and shaping stories of the nation.

  8. The Black Pacific: Anti-colonial Struggle and Oceanic Connections

    Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, Volume 3, Issue 4, Page 582-583, October 2017.
  9. Unemployment, Trust in Government, and Satisfaction with Democracy: An Empirical Investigation

    Evidence suggests that unemployment negatively affects various aspects of individuals’ lives. The author investigates whether unemployment changes individuals’ political evaluations in the form of trust in government and satisfaction with democracy. While most research in this area operates on the macro level, the author provides individual-level evidence. In doing so, the author investigates the assumed causal link with panel data from Switzerland and the Netherlands.

  10. Historical Sociology’s Puzzle of the Missing Transitions

    Prominent accounts of the transition to capitalism have a far too limited understanding of pre-capitalist agrarian economies’ potential for dynamism. Recent research shows that conditions earlier accounts identify as triggers for a transition to capitalism could be present without a transition occurring. I expand on implications of these cases of “missing transitions” for theorizing the dynamics of pre-capitalist agrarian economies.