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  1. Expensive Childcare and Short School Days = Lower Maternal Employment and More Time in Childcare? Evidence from the American Time Use Survey

    This study investigates the relationship between maternal employment and state-to-state differences in childcare cost and mean school day length. Pairing state-level measures with an individual-level sample of prime working-age mothers from the American Time Use Survey (2005–2014; n = 37,993), we assess the multilevel and time-varying effects of childcare costs and school day length on maternal full-time and part-time employment and childcare time.
  2. The Temporal Logic of Deservingness: Inequality Beliefs in Two Postsocialist Societies

    Employing a cultural sociological approach, this article asks how individuals from two postsocialist societies articulate principles of justice by providing narrative accounts of other peoples’ perceived choices and social mobility trajectories after 1989.
  3. Legally a Lady

    In a period of ambiguous legal culture between the U.S. Civil War and the legal imposition of Jim Crow, court cases reveal Black women navigating race, class, and gender as they sought a seat in the Ladies’ Car and claimed their right to dignity within American society.
  4. Detention, Disappearance, and the Politics of Family

    Examining immigrant detention and forced disappearance through their effects on family and social networkds reveals the pernicious power of state removals.
  5. Beyond Tracking and Detracking: The Dimensions of Organizational Differentiation in Schools

    Schools use an array of strategies to match curricula and instruction to students’ heterogeneous skills. Although generations of scholars have debated ‘‘tracking’’ and its consequences, the literature fails to account for diversity of school-level sorting practices.

  6. Making Homes Unhomely: The Politics of Displacement in a Gentrifying Neighborhood in Chicago

    Scholars have long debated the causes, processes, and effects of displacement by gentrification in global north cities and more recently around the world. Based on an ethnographic study in Chicago's Albany Park neighborhood, this article shows how limited liability corporations use discrete and accretive violence in the early stages of gentrification. We also document how tenants contest harassment and neglect by carrying out “limit‐acts” to make visible everyday invisible practices of intimidation and coercion and to cope with the private forces that displace them.

  7. Racial/Ethnic Hierarchy and Urban Labor Market Inequality: Four Poignant Historical Cases

    The sociological literature, although rich on the topic of racial/ethnic hierarchy, often overlooks its spatially varying nature relative to group tensions and inequality. In this article, we address this gap by drawing on and analyzing four historically important U.S. urban cases (i.e., Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York City) that reflect both compositional diversity and significant variation in racial/ethnic group sizes. Our analyses, which draw on U.S.

  8. Disentangling the Effects of Race and Place in Economic Transactions: Findings from an Online Field Experiment

    Scholarship on discrimination consistently shows that non‐Whites are at a disadvantage in obtaining goods and services relative to Whites. To a lesser extent, recent work has asked whether or not place of residence may also affect individuals’ chances in economic markets. In this study, we use a field experiment in an online market for second‐hand goods to examine transactional opportunities for White, Black, Asian, and Latino residents of both advantaged and disadvantaged neighborhoods.

  9. The Growth Machine Across the United States: Business Actors’ Influence on Communities’ Economic Development and Limited‐Government Austerity Policies

    The growth machine (GM) perspective has long guided urban research. Our study provides a new extension of this perspective, focusing on local business actors’ influence on communities across the United States. We question whether GM‐oriented business actors remain widely associated with contemporary local economic development policies, and further, whether these actors influence the use of limited‐government austerity policies. Conceptually, we extend the GM framework by bringing it into dialogue with the literature on urban austerity policy.

  10. Rhetorics of Radicalism

    What rhetorics run throughout radical discourse, and why do some gain prominence over others? The scholarship on radicalism largely portrays radical discourse as opposition to powerful ideas and enemies, but radicals often evince great interest in personal and local concerns. To shed light on how radicals use and adopt rhetoric, we analyze an original corpus of more than 23,000 pages produced by Afghan radical groups between 1979 and 2001 using a novel computational abductive approach.