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  1. Race, Class, and the Framing of Drug Epidemics

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 4, Page 46-51, Fall 2017.
  2. Is the Public Getting Smarter on Crime?

    The crime rate surely ranks among the most used and abused social indicators. In politics, media, and popular culture, crime and punishment are invoked to stir up strong public sentiments. But while crime is clearly a social construction, it is also a real concern for individuals, families, and communities. So we can learn a lot by asking a representative sample of Americans what they think about crime and punishment, especially when we track their attitudes and opinions over time.

  3. Poverty Dynamics, Parenting, and Child Mental Health in Canada

    Although the detrimental effects of poverty on child mental health are well established, questions remain as to which aspects of poverty matter most and which mechanisms account for the association. This study tested the relative influence of depth of current poverty and poverty duration on child anxiety/depression and antisocial behavior, then evaluated whether parenting practices mediated observed associations.
  4. The Hidden Privilege in “Potty Politics”

    The purpose, emergence, and accessibility of public restrooms in the U.S. have always involved battles over privacy, cleanliness, segregation, and legislation.
  5. The Paradoxical Relationship between Renewable Energy and Economic Growth: A Cross-National Panel Study, 1990-2013

    This cross-national study employs a time-series cross-sectional Prais-Winsten regression model with panel-corrected standard errors to examine the relationship between renewable energy consumption and economic growth, and its impact on total carbon dioxide emissions and carbon dioxide emissions per unit of GDP. Findings indicate that renewable energy consumption has its largest negative effect on total carbon emissions and carbon emissions per unit of GDP in low-income countries.
  6. Educational Inequalities in Depression: Do Labor Markets Matter?

    There is little theoretical understanding of why educational inequalities in depression are larger in some countries than in others. The current research tries to fill this gap by focusing on the way in which important labor market processes, specifically upgrading and polarization, affect the relationship between education and depression. Analyses are based on a subsample, aged between 20 and 65, in 26 countries participating in the European Social Survey (N = 56,881) in 2006, 2012, and 2014.
  7. Relationships between the Public and Crimmigration Entities in North Carolina: A 287(g) Program Focus

    How does local law enforcement, with the aid of city and county governments, respond to racialized immigrant threat through policy implementation, namely, through adoption of intergovernmental agreements? More specifically, how is this response tailored for Latino immigrant communities, particularly in new destination communities?
  8. Social Effects of Health Care Reform

    Do public health policy interventions result in prosocial behaviors? The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansions were responsible for the largest gains in public insurance coverage since its inception in 1965. These gains were concentrated in states that opted to expand Medicaid eligibility, and they provide a unique opportunity to study not just medical but also social consequences of increased public health coverage. The authors examine the association between Medicaid and volunteer work.
  9. Chump Change

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 12-23, Winter 2016.
  10. Could There Be a Silver Lining to Zika?

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 36-41, Winter 2016.