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  1. I Retired. Now Who Am I?

    Consciously uncoupled from the career, Bill Falk considers the self.

  2. Review Essays: Nations, Empires, and Wars

    Gregory Hooks reviews Waves of War: Nationalism, State Formation, and Ethnic Exclusion in the Modern World, by Andreas Wimmer.

  3. Review Essays: Labor and Inequality: American Society After the Decline of Unions

    Sociologists of labor extoll pros and cons of what trade unions do or have done, but the consequences of labor’s near-disappearance are rarely mentioned.

  4. Contextualizing Intergroup Contact: Do Political Party Cues Enhance Contact Effects?

    This article examines intergroup contact effects in different political contexts. We expand on previous efforts of social psychologists by incorporating the messages of political parties as a contextual trigger of group membership awareness in contact situations. We argue that the focus among political parties on us-them categorizations heightens the awareness of group memberships. This focus in turn enhances the positive intergroup contact effect by stimulating majority members to perceive contacted persons as prototypical outgroup members.

  5. Healthy Time Use in the Encore Years: Do Work, Resources, Relations, and Gender Matter?

    Social engagement is theorized to promote health, with ages 55 to 75—what some call “encore” adulthood—potentially being a time for ongoing engagement or social isolation. We use the American Time Use Survey (N = 11,952) and a life course perspective to examine associations between paid work, resources, relations, and healthy time use for men and women in the first (55–64) and second (65–74) halves of the encore years. Work limits sufficient sleep (full-time working men) and television watching (all workers) but also time spent in physical activity (full-time workers).

  6. Gender Orientation and the Cost of Caring for Others

    The "cost-of-caring" thesis asserts that observed gender differences in psychological distress are largely a consequence of women’s greater emotional investment in the lives of their loved ones. Research on this topic has supported this thesis by showing that network events result in higher levels of depressive symptoms for women compared to men. However, other evidence challenges this claim. In light of these divergent findings, this paper elaborates this topic in three ways.

  7. From Ferguson to France

    Jean Beaman compares the conditions that led to 2005 uprisings in French banlieues and 2014 protests in cities across the U.S.

  8. What happened to the “War on Women?”

    Deana A. Rohlinger contrasts the war on women with the war for women–or at least their votes.

  9. How Grassroots Groups Lose Political Imagination

    http://ctx.sagepub.com/content/14/1/32.abstract

  10. Immigrant Cities as Reservations for Low Wage Labor

    http://ctx.sagepub.com/content/14/1/26.abstract