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  1. Spillover and Crossover Effects of Work-Family Conflict among Married and Cohabiting Couples

    The present study uses Wave 8 of the German Family Panel to test the spillover and crossover effects of work-family conflict on job satisfaction, relationship satisfaction, and mental health for individuals (actor effects) as well as their spouses/partners (partner effects) in dual-earning couples. We further contribute by assessing whether the results vary by gender and union type. Results suggest that among married couples, for job satisfaction, there are no gender differences in actor effects (but gender differences in partner effects), and actor and partner effects remain distinct.
  2. Polluted Bodies

    Domestic employment requires unique physical proximity of bodies from different social classes, and often from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. Despite the physical closeness, different strategies are used to reproduce class hierarchies among people, resulting in embodied inequality.
  3. “Go See Somebody”: How Spouses Promote Mental Health Care

    This study considers when, whether, and how spouses encourage professional mental health care by analyzing qualitative data from 90 in-depth interviews with gay, lesbian, and heterosexual spouses. Findings show that a majority of spouses are engaged in promoting each other’s mental health care but that the strategies used to promote care vary by gender and the gender composition of the couple. The majority of gay men and lesbian women promote care by framing mental health problems as largely biochemical, fixable only with professional care or medicine, and work to destigmatize this care.
  4. ASA Statement Condemning Online Harassment

    The American Sociological Association (ASA) expresses deep concern for and solidarity with our colleagues who are suffering vicious online harassment.
     
    These attacks frequently target sociologists for their commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion.  Members of the sociology community from historically marginalized populations, including people of color and members of the LGBTQ community, are frequently singled out for harassment.
     

  5. Call for Papers: Special Issue of Teaching Sociology

    Teaching Sociology invites manuscripts for a special issue on "Teaching Sexualities" to be edited by  to be edited Shantel Gabrieal Buggs, Andrea Miller, and J.E. Sumerau.

    At a time when both courses and course materials for teaching the sociology of sexualities are on the rise, this special issue seeks to gain insights from those who deliver sexualities courses in hopes of providing guidance for other instructors.

    Initial submissions are due July 1, 2020.

  6. Listening for the Interior in Hip-Hop and R&B Music

    This article analyzes how four Black musical artists make “quiet,” or the inner life of African Americans, legible. Specifically, we consider ways that the quiet found within the lyrics of recent acclaimed albums from two hip-hop artists and two neo-soul artists—Kendrick Lamar’s DAMN (2017) and Rapsody’s Laila’s Wisdom (2017), Solange’s A Seat at the Table (2016) and Maxwell’s blackSUMMERS’night (2016), respectively—offer subtle, quotidian challenges to oppression, dehumanization, and objectification.
  7. Leveraging Youth: Overcoming Intergenerational Tensions in Creative Production

    The sociological literature on creativity would suggest that collaboration between newcomers and more experienced members of an art world results in the fruitful combination of novelty and usefulness, though not without some conflict.
  8. Hegemonic Femininities and Intersectional Domination

    We examine how two sociological traditions account for the role of femininities in social domination. The masculinities tradition theorizes gender as an independent structure of domination; consequently, femininities that complement hegemonic masculinities are treated as passively compliant in the reproduction of gender. In contrast, Patricia Hill Collins views cultural ideals of hegemonic femininity as simultaneously raced, classed, and gendered.
  9. Love Me Tinder, Love Me Sweet

    by Jennifer Hickes Lundquist and Celeste Vaughan Curington

  10. Genes, Gender Inequality, and Educational Attainment

    Women’s opportunities have been profoundly altered over the past century by reductions in the social and structural constraints that limit women’s educational attainment. Do social constraints manifest as a suppressing influence on genetic indicators of potential, and if so, did equalizing opportunity mean equalizing the role of genetics? We address this with three cohort studies: the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS; birth years 1939 to 1940), the Health and Retirement Study, and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health; birth years 1975 to 1982).