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  1. Taking a Knee

    Simon E. Weffer, Rodrigo Dominguez-Martinez, and Raymond Jenkins on the timing and prevalence of NFL protests.

  2. The Global South

    The phrase “Global South” marks a shift from a focus on development or cultural difference toward an emphasis on geopolitical power relations. Nour Dados and Raewyn Connell demystify and contextualize this term.

  3. Featured Article: Struggling to Connect: White and Black Feminism in the Movement Years

    Why did an interracial feminist movement fail to develop in the United States? Were white feminists racist?

  4. How Religious Composition Around the World Differs between Younger and Older Populations

    This graphic shows differences in the religious composition of people around the world by age group. Religious change caused by demographic processes is more than a hypothetical future possibility. The consequences of demographic differences can be seen today by comparing the religious composition of younger and older populations.

  5. Access to Higher Education of Afro-Peruvians: Disentangling the Influence of Skin Color and Social Origins in the Peruvian Stratification System

    Despite recent efforts by the Peruvian government to rectify centuries of injustice against Afro-Peruvians, not much is known about the relative influence of discrimination and social origins on Afro-Peruvians’ access to higher education. Using data from the 2014 Specialized Study of Afro-Peruvian Population and logistic regression, the authors examine the influence of skin color and social origins on access to higher education for Afro-Peruvians.

  6. Learning about Race: The Lived Experiences of Interracially Married U.S.-born White and European Immigrant Women in the 1930s

    How did intermarriage between African Americans and European immigrants influence how European immigrants learned about race in the United States? In this study, the authors compare the lived experiences of European-born and U.S.-born white women married to U.S.-born black men in Chicago in the late 1930s. The authors find that both groups of women characterized their lives as marked by material, social, and institutional costs, and they experienced these costs as racial boundary policing, racial border patrolling, and rebound racism.

  7. Royall Must Fall: Old and New Battles on the Memory of Slavery in New England

    There is much scholarly and public debate over how slavery should be remembered, especially in the southern United States. We have seen this recently with the case of Charlottesville, Virginia, where protest ensued over a statue of Robert E. Lee. However, attention should also be paid to the history of slavery in the northern United States, particularly in places such as New England, where attempts were made to silence this history.

  8. Stigmatization of War Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): Stereotyping and Social Distance Findings

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects a significant portion of the US population, but there remains limited information on public responses to affected individuals. Diagnosed mental illnesses can lead to negative stereotyping by the public, who can then socially exclude or otherwise discriminate. This paper presents results of an experiment (N = 830) that assessed the extent to which workers with PTSD labels—either resulting from an auto accident or wartime military service—evoked negative stereotypes in a workplace scenario and social distance from study participants.

  9. Mental Illness as a Stigmatized Identity

    In this study, we examine the relationships among reflected appraisals, self-views, and well-being for individuals diagnosed with severe and persistent mental illness. We also test a perceptual control model of identity to determine whether discrepancies between stigmatized reflected appraisals and stigmatized self-views are associated with self-evaluation (self-esteem and self-efficacy) and psychological distress (depressive symptoms). We find that stigmatized self-views are significantly associated with lower self-esteem and self-efficacy and higher levels of depressive symptoms.

  10. Ordinary Lives and the Sociological Character of Stress: How Work, Family, and Status Contribute to Emotional Inequality

    It has been thirty years since the publication of Leonard Pearlin’s (1989) “The Sociological Study of Stress.” This classic work left an indelible mark, shaping the way the field thinks about stressors, their emotional consequences, and the factors that influence the nature of the links between stressors and outcomes.