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  1. COVID-19 Resources for Sociologists

    Every day we face new challenges related to COVID-19. ASA wants to help sociologists navigate those challenges. We are offering several resources to help sociologists in their work during this period.

  2. Power, Hegemony, and World Society Theory: A Critical Evaluation

    World society theory has been one of the better published theoretical paradigms of the past 30 to 40 years. But despite its publishing successes, world society theory and research are beset by a number of theoretical and empirical problems that call into question the theory’s ability to accurately describe and explain the global diffusion of government practices, policies, and structures.

  3. The 2020 ASA Annual Meeting in San Francisco Is Cancelled

    Dear colleagues,
     
    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2020 ASA Annual Meeting in San Francisco has been cancelled. It is now clear that the global health crisis will not be resolved by August, and a large gathering of people from around the world represents an untenable health risk.
     

  4. A Call to Higher Education Administrators Regarding Student Educational Progress During COVID-19

    The COVID-19 global pandemic has created unprecedented challenges for higher education. Institutions are faced with difficult decisions about how best to continue serving their educational and research missions, while also protecting individual and public health. Institutions moved at exceptional speed to close their campuses and move all instruction online.

  5. Supporting Sociologists Around the World During COVID-19


    The American Sociological Association (ASA) is concerned about the well-being of sociologists around the world as the COVID19 pandemic changes the course of daily life in fundamental ways.  We recognize that the nature of the challenges facing individual sociologists varies not only by personal conditions, but by the conditions of the country in which one resides. We support sociologists around the world as they make efforts to address this crisis through sociological research, and we express solidarity with our global sociological family interested in the well-being of humanity.

  6. Winter/Spring 2020 Issue of Journal of World-Systems Research

    The Journal of World-Systems Research has released its Winter/Spring 2020 issue.

  7. Comparing Internet Experiences and Prosociality in Amazon Mechanical Turk and Population-Based Survey Samples

    Given the high cost of traditional survey administration (postal mail, phone) and the limits of convenience samples such as university students, online samples offer a much welcomed alternative. Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT) has been especially popular among academics for conducting surveys and experiments. Prior research has shown that AMT samples are not representative of the general population along some dimensions, but evidence suggests that these differences may not undermine the validity of AMT research.
  8. Statement Reaffirming ASA’s Commitment to Scholarly Freedom

    As we enter a new decade, the American Sociological Association (ASA) expresses concern about sociologists around the world who continue to face governmental restrictions on their scholarly activity.  

  9. Marking Time in Memorials and Museums of Terror: Temporality and Cultural Trauma

    The theory of cultural trauma focuses on the relationship between shared suffering and collective identity: Events become traumatic when they threaten a group’s foundational self-understanding. As it stands, the theory has illuminated profound parallels in societal suffering across space and time. Yet focusing on identity alone cannot explain the considerable differences that scholars document in the outcomes of the trauma process.
  10. Pro-Environmental Views of Climate Skeptics

    by Kristin Haltinner and Dilshani Sarathchandra

    Nick was not always skeptical about human-caused climate change; for most of his life, he believed the science as presented in documentaries and on the news. Things began to change for Nick around 2014 when some of the predictions made in Al Gore’s Inconvenient Truth still hadn’t been realized. In Nick’s words: “You have Gore and other people who have said the ice caps should be melted by now… Clearly, that was wrong.”