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  1. Neighborhood Effects on Immigrants’ Experiences of Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Distress

    The neighborhood context is considered a key institution of inequality influencing individuals’ exposure and psychological vulnerability to stressors in the work-family interface, including work-family conflict (WFC). However, experiences of neighborhood context, WFC, and its mental health consequences among minority populations—including foreign-born residents—remain unexplored. We address this limitation and draw on tenants of the stress process model to unpack our hypotheses. We further test whether our focal associations vary for mothers and fathers.
  2. Keeping up with the Joneses: How Households Fared in the Era of High Income Inequality and the Housing Price Bubble, 1999–2007

    Sociologists conceptualize lifestyles as structured hierarchically where people seek to emulate those higher up. Growing income inequality in the United States means those at the top bid up the price of valued goods like housing and those in lower groups have struggled to maintain their relative positions. We explore this process in the context of the U.S. housing market from 1999 to 2007 by analyzing over 4,000 residential moves from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Houses are the ultimate status symbol. Their size, quality, and location signal to others that one has (or has not) arrived.
  3. Born Poor? Racial Diversity, Inequality, and the American Pipeline

    The authors examine racial disparities in infants’ exposure to economic disadvantage at the family and local area levels. Using data from the 2008–2014 files of the American Community Survey, the authors provide an up-to-date empirical benchmark of newborns’ exposure to poverty. Large shares of Hispanic (36.5 percent) and black (43.2 percent) infants are born poor, though white infants are also overrepresented among the poor (17.7 percent).
  4. Trust in the Bayou City: Do Racial Segregation and Discrimination Matter for Generalized Trust?

    The key role that generalized trust plays in social capital formation is well documented, but its determinants are not well understood. Many studies suggest that racially and ethnically diverse areas have lower generalized trust than more homogeneous areas, but evidence regarding the impact of the spatial arrangement of racial and ethnic groups is not conclusive. Further, while scholars theorize that discrimination may play a role in racial trust gaps, no study has empirically supported this linkage.
  5. Environmental Consequences of Moral Disinhibition

    The author introduces the concept of the moral disinhibition effect as a partial explanation for some unanticipated and/or unintended consequences of technologies. The moral disinhibition effect relates to how a reduction in an undesirable consequence of consuming a particular good or service (such as carbon emissions per unit of electricity consumption) may reduce societal or individual-level inhibition about overusing such a good or service and thereby increase demand and, potentially, the total consequence.
  6. Review Essays: New Sociology of Housing

    In 2013, Mary Pattillo proposed a new agenda for the sociology of housing, focused on the way that rights to housing are created, distributed, and enforced (Pattillo 2013). The books here take up her call. They focus, respectively, on private rental housing, subsidized affordable housing in mixed-income developments, and debt-financed home ownership. What they have in common is a focus on housing not only as a built environment, a location in space, or a habitation where we learn and enact cultural practices, but also as a set of positions in social relations.
  7. Attention for Sale

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 2, Page 60-61, Spring 2017.
  8. Sources of Segregation in Social Networks: A Novel Approach Using Facebook

    <p>Most research on segregation in social networks considers small circles of strong ties, and little is known about segregation among the much larger number of weaker ties. This article proposes a novel approach to the study of these more extended networks, through the use of data on personal ties in an online social network. We illustrate this method’s potential by describing and explaining the degree of ethnic and gender segregation on Facebook among a representative survey of adolescents in the Netherlands (N = 2,810; ~1.1 million Facebook friends).

  9. Waiting for Bobos: Displacement and Impeded Gentrification in a Midwestern City

    The degree to which lower-income residents are displaced by the process of gentrification has been the subject of considerable debate. Displacement is generally framed as a possible, and potentially remediable, outcome of gentrification. This portrayal of the link between gentrification and displacement is problematic, though, because gentrification can proceed without substantial displacement, while displacement frequently occurs in the absence of gentrification. In this article, I use a historical case study to examine the link between displacement and gentrification.

  10. Hope for Cities or Hope for People: Neighborhood Development and Demographic Change

    This study, recognizing the longstanding criticisms of HOPE VI as a vehicle for gentrification, compares the goals of local officials with the stated goals of HOPE VI in order to investigate the extent to which local officials are using or misusing HOPE VI to achieve local development and revitalization goals.