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  1. Modern Social Hierarchies and the Spaces between: How Are Subjective Status Inconsistencies Linked to Mental Well-Being?

    Higher socioeconomic status is linked to higher mental well-being, but modern individuals inhabit multiple hierarchies and reference groups—and thus well-being may be determined between as much as within socioeconomic statuses. Drawing on proprietary national data collected by Gallup in 2017, I find that inconsistency between one’s perceived standing in society and one’s standing in more local hierarchies based in neighbors or friends is quite common.
  2. Social and Genetic Pathways in Multigenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment

    This study investigates the complex roles of the social environment and genes in the multigenerational transmission of educational attainment. Drawing on genome-wide data and educational attainment measures from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) and the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), I conduct polygenic score analyses to examine genetic confounding in the estimation of parents’ and grandparents’ influences on their children’s and grandchildren’s educational attainment.
  3. The Mark of a Woman’s Record: Gender and Academic Performance in Hiring

    Women earn better grades than men across levels of education—but to what end? This article assesses whether men and women receive equal returns to academic performance in hiring. I conducted an audit study by submitting 2,106 job applications that experimentally manipulated applicants’ GPA, gender, and college major. Although GPA matters little for men, women benefit from moderate achievement but not high achievement. As a result, high-achieving men are called back significantly more often than high-achieving women—at a rate of nearly 2-to-1.
  4. Separate and Unequal: The Impact of Socioeconomic Status, Segregation, and the Great Recession on Racial Disparities in Housing Values

    The effects of race, class, and residential segregation on housing values continue to be a major focus of sociological research. Nevertheless, there has yet to be a study that places these factors in the context of the great recession of 2008 and 2009. Accordingly, the purpose of this work is to assess the extent to which the great recession affected housing values for African Americans and whites relative to the joint effects of race, class, and residential segregation.
  5. School Strictness and Education: Investigating Racial and Ethnic Educational Inequalities Associated with Being Pushed Out

    There are racial and ethnic disparities associated with school discipline practices and pushout rates. In addition, research suggests that urban schools have stricter school discipline practices and higher pushout rates. What remains unknown, however, is the relationship between racial and ethnic inequality, school discipline practices, and pushout rates across urban, rural, and suburban schools.
  6. Completing the Educational Career: High School Graduation, Four-year College Enrollment, and Bachelor’s Degree Completion among Black, Hispanic, and White Students

    Using data from the Education Longitudinal Study, the author investigates racial disparities in high school graduation, four-year college enrollment, and bachelor’s degree completion. In addition, the author considers how conditionally relevant college and early adult variables shape bachelor’s degree completion. The results indicate that although comparable numbers of black and Hispanic students obtain bachelor’s degrees, their educational career trajectories differ substantially.
  7. Pushing the Boundaries: Searching for Housing in the Most Segregated Metropolis in America

    The Housing Choice Voucher Program struggles to assist families in accessing low‐poverty neighborhoods. This paper explores a newly introduced incentive in the voucher program in Milwaukee County that could expand its potential to improve locational outcomes by providing security deposit assistance to households who move to a suburban jurisdiction. Using in‐depth interviews we examine the different ways voucher users responded to the program and how it interacted with their life experiences and search strategies.

  8. Studentification and Disorder in a College Town

    This study uses interview and focus group data to examine how residents perceive and cope with studentification, disorder, and neighbor conflict in a college town. First, we find that nonstudent residents perceive studentification as the cause of neighborhood decline, but mainly blame larger forces and local actors, such as the university, city officials, and local developers, rather than the students.

  9. Genuine Anger, Genuinely Misplaced

    Arlie Hochschild, Berkeley sociologist, returned to Louisiana in September 2017. Her third visit since the publication of Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right, the trip came on the heels of the “Unite the Right’” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia (see Viewpoints, this issue).
  10. Maintaining Supremacy by Blocking Affirmative Action

    Today, affirmative action’s greatest power comes in its deployment as an extremely efficient rhetorical tool for mobilizing White resistance to racial equit, appropriating civil rights language to serve the goals of White supremacy.