American Sociological Association

Search

Search

The search found 12 results in 0.023 seconds.

Search results

  1. Study Finds Foreclosures Fueled Racial Segregation in U.S.

    Some 9 million American families lost their homes to foreclosure during the late 2000s housing bust, driving many to economic ruin and in search of new residences. Hardest hit were black, Latino, and racially integrated neighborhoods, according to a new Cornell University analysis of the crisis.

    Led by demographer Matthew Hall, researchers estimate racial segregation grew between Latinos and whites by nearly 50 percent and between blacks and whites by about 20 percent as whites abandoned and minorities moved into areas most heavily distressed by foreclosures.

  2. Many Religious People View Science Favorably, But Reject Certain Scientific Theories

    A new study finds that many U.S. adults — roughly one in five — are deeply religious, know a lot about science, and support many practical uses of science and technology in everyday life, but reject scientific explanations of creation and evolution.

  3. With Racial Segregation Declining Between Neighborhoods, Segregation Now Taking New Form

    Recent research has shown that racial segregation in the U.S. is declining between neighborhoods, but a new study indicates that segregation is manifesting itself in other ways — not disappearing.

  4. Veterans Live in More Diverse Neighborhoods Than Their Civilian Counterparts of Same Race

    When members of the U.S. military leave the service, they tend to settle in neighborhoods with greater overall diversity than their civilian counterparts of the same race, according to a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  5. Young Whites Usually More Optimistic Than Minority Peers About Likelihood of Living to 35

    A new study of young people finds that, with one exception, whites are more optimistic — sometimes drastically so — than their minority peers about their likelihood of living to 35.

  6. Study Investigates Why Blacks Have Higher Risk of Cognitive Impairment

    Social and economic disadvantages play a significant role in why blacks face a much higher risk than whites of developing cognitive impairment later in life, indicates a national study led by a Michigan State University (MSU) sociologist.

  7. Study Finds Evidence of Racial and Class Discrimination Among Psychotherapists

    A new study suggests that psychotherapists discriminate against prospective patients who are black or working class.

    "Although I expected to find racial and class-based disparities, the magnitude of the discrimination working-class therapy seekers faced exceeded my grimmest expectations," said Heather Kugelmass, a doctoral student in sociology at Princeton University and the author of the study.

  8. Study Reveals Incarceration’s Hidden Wounds for African American Men

    There’s a stark and troubling way that incarceration diminishes the ability of a former inmate to empathize with a loved one behind bars, but existing sociological theories fail to capture it, Vanderbilt University sociologists have found.

  9. Youth Cyberbullying Most Common Among Current or Former Friends and Dating Partners

    Youth cyberbullying is dramatically more likely to occur between current or former friends and dating partners than between students who were never friends or in a romantic relationship, suggests a new study that was presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  10. ‘I Miss You So Much’: How Twitter Is Broadening the Conversation on Death and Mourning

    Death and mourning were largely considered private matters in the 20th century, with the public remembrances common in previous eras replaced by intimate gatherings behind closed doors in funeral parlors and family homes.

    But social media is redefining how people grieve, and Twitter in particular — with its ephemeral mix of rapid-fire broadcast and personal expression — is widening the conversation around death and mourning, two University of Washington (UW) sociologists say.