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  1. Sub-Saharan Africans Satisfied With Their Sex Lives, With 18 Percent Rating Them a Perfect 10

    People in Africa’s Sub-Sahara region, a relatively undeveloped area, are generally satisfied with their sex lives, with the most common rating —  reported by 18 percent of respondents — being a perfect “10,” according to Baylor University research that was presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  2. Private Detention of Immigrants Deters Family Visits, Study Finds

    Immigrants detained in a privately run detention facility while awaiting deportation decisions are far less likely than those held in county or city jails to receive visits from their children, a new study finds. 

  3. Study Suggests Sex in Later Years Harmful to Men’s Heart Health, But Not Women’s

    Having sex frequently — and enjoying it — puts older men at higher risk for heart attacks and other cardiovascular problems. For older women, however, good sex may actually lower the risk of hypertension.

    That’s according to the first large-scale study of how sex affects heart health in later life. The federally funded research, led by a Michigan State University (MSU) scholar, appears in the September issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

  4. Doing Sociology: Jose Calderon

    ASA speaks with retired sociologist Jose Calderon at the 2016 ASA Annual Meeting on August, 2016, in Seattle, WA. Calderon talks about what it means to “do sociology,” how he uses sociology in his work, highlights of his work in the field, the relevance of sociological work to society, and his advice to students interested in entering the field. 

  5. Doing Sociology: Jessica Calarco

    ASA speaks with ethnographer and sociologist Jessica Calarco at the 2016 ASA Annual Meeting on August, 2016, in Seattle, WA. Calarco talks about what it means to “do sociology,” how she uses sociology in her work, highlights of her work in the field, the relevance of sociological work to society, and her advice to students interested in entering the field. 

  6. Doing Sociology: Doug Hartmann

    ASA speaks with sociologist Doug Hartmann at the 2016 ASA Annual Meeting on August, 2016, in Seattle, WA. Hartmann talks about what it means to “do sociology,” how he uses sociology in his work, highlights of his work in the field, the relevance of sociological work to society, and his advice to students interested in entering the field. 

  7. Doing Sociology: Manisha Desai and Zakia Salime

    ASA speaks with sociologists Manisha Desai and Zakia Salime at the 2016 ASA Annual Meeting on August, 2016, in Seattle, WA. Desai and Salime talk about what it means to “do sociology,” how they use sociology in their work, highlights of their work in the field, the relevance of sociological work to society, and their advice to students interested in entering the field. 

  8. Doing Sociology: Christopher Dum

    ASA speaks with sociologist Christopher Dum at the 2016 ASA Annual Meeting on August, 2016, in Seattle, WA. Dum talks about what it means to “do sociology,” how he uses sociology in his work, highlights of his work in the field, the relevance of sociological work to society, and his advice to students interested in entering the field. 

  9. Probing Change in Racial Self-identification: A Focus on Children of Immigrants

    Recent studies have shown that racial identification varies across context and time. Although sociologists recognize many contextual factors associated with racial group membership, relatively little attention has been given to understanding the specific factors—such as self-perceptions, socioeconomic incentives, and family pressures—that relate to changes in racial self-identification, especially among children of immigrants individuals who may have a relatively high propensity for inconsistency in racial identification.

  10. Daughters of Interracial Parents More Likely Than Sons to Identify As Multiracial

    Daughters of interracial parents are more likely than sons to identify as multiracial, and this is especially true for children of black-white couples, according to a new study which appeared in the February, 2016 issue of the American Sociological Review.