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  1. Review Essays: Understanding Mexican Immigration in a New Way

    Richard Alba reviews On the Move: Changing Mechanisms of Mexico-U.S. Migration, by Filiz Garip.
  2. Rust Belt Boomerang: The Pull of Place in Moving Back to a Legacy City

    Research and journalistic accounts on the Rust Belt consistently focus on population decline and its consequences. As a result, we know little about the growing trend of return migration of young professionals and knowledge workers to the region. Why have these individuals chosen to return to a place that they once left? I answer this question using in-depth interviews with young professionals who have moved back to Youngstown, Ohio. Results indicate that return migrants chose to return despite reporting alternative and perhaps more economically rational work opportunities elsewhere.

  3. Black lives and police tactics matter

    by Rory Kramer, Brianna Remster, and Camille Z. Charles in the Summer 2017 Contexts

  4. Racializing “Illegality”: An Intersectional Approach to Understanding How Mexican-origin Women Navigate an Anti-immigrant Climate

    By shedding light on how Mexicans are racialized, scholars have brought racism to the forefront of migration research. Still, less is known about how “illegality” complicates racialized experiences, and even less is known about how gender and class further complicate this process. Drawing on 60 interviews with Mexican-origin women in Houston, Texas, this research explores how documented and Mexican American women are racialized, the institutional contexts in which this process occurs, and how women’s racialized experiences relate to feelings of belonging and exclusion.
  5. Immigrant Rights are Civil Rights

    Black-brown coalition activism is changing hearts, minds, and legislation in Missouri and across the American South.

  6. Addicted to Hate: Identity Residual among Former White Supremacists

    The process of leaving deeply meaningful and embodied identities can be experienced as a struggle against addiction, with continuing cognitive, emotional, and physiological responses that are involuntary, unwanted, and triggered by environmental factors. Using data derived from a unique set of in-depth life history interviews with 89 former U.S. white supremacists, as well as theories derived from recent advances in cognitive sociology, we examine how a rejected identity can persist despite a desire to change.
  7. Film Review: abUSed: The Postville Raid

    AbUSed tells the story of how an immigration raid frightened and economically devastated a small town in Iowa. The film is engaging and students learn not only about what happened on that day but also about the inner workings of immigration law. The film provides various perspectives on what happened in Postville on Friday, May 9, 2008. We hear from faith and community leaders, migration experts, lawyers, employees, shopkeepers, and community members.
  8. “An Earnest Desire for the Truth despite Its Possible Unpleasantness”: A Comparative Analysis of the Atlanta University Publications and American Journal of Sociology, 1895 to 1917

    The authors examine the methodological sophistication of the research conducted by the W.E.B. Du Bois–led Atlanta Sociological Laboratory (ASL), the first American school of sociology, and Albion Small–edited American Journal of Sociology (AJS). Comparative analysis of the ASL publications and scholarly articles in AJS between 1895 and 1917 is undertaken to identify articulations of the method(s) of research offered in both. The authors conclude that the articulation of research methods by the ASL is superior to those from AJS.
  9. Fueling White Injury Ideology: Public Officials’ Racial Discourse in Support of Arizona Senate Bill 1070

    In a seemingly post-racial moment in 2010, Arizona’s Senate Bill (SB) 1070 was under fire and challenged as racially discriminatory. While the 2010 immigration bill was popular among white Arizonians, critics charged that SB 1070 could facilitate the racial profiling of all Latinos/as in state law enforcement officers’ efforts to check the legal status of those they suspect are undocumented.
  10. A Resistance Dance

    In Oaxaca, a forced migration is still channeled into the Dance of the Feather, some 500 years later.