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  1. Punishment, Religion, and the Shrinking Welfare State for the Very Poor in the United States, 1970–2010

    Punishment, Religion, and the Shrinking Welfare State for the Very Poor in the United States, 1970–2010
  2. American Religion, All or Nothing at All

    Most Contexts readers will know that in recent years Americans became less attached to organized religion. The 2016 General Social Survey (GSS) estimated that 22% of adults preferred no religion, up from 21% in 2014, 14% in 2004, 9% in 1994, and 7% in both 1984 and 1974. This strong trend invites the inference that American religion is declining rapidly. But no single trend can give a complete view of a complicated institution. The rise of the “nones” is interesting, in part, because it is the most extreme evidence of religious decline in the United States.

  3. Traditional, Modern, and Post-Secular Perspectives on Science and Religion in the United States

    Using General Social Survey data, we examine perspectives on science and religion in the United States. Latent class analysis reveals three groups based on knowledge and attitudes about science, religiosity, and preferences for certain religious interpretations of the world. The traditional perspective (43 percent) is marked by a preference for religion compared to science; the modern perspective (36 percent) holds the opposite view. A third perspective, which we call post-secular (21 percent), views both science and religion favorably.

  4. Marrying Social Activism and Spiritual Seeking

    Eve Fox speaks with Elizabeth Lesser about founding a prominent center for holistic learning.

  5. Glory and Gore

    Who’s the most important character in the Iliad? That depends. Using the poem, Rossman illustrates how to understand related but conceptually distinct concepts through social network analysis.

  6. Muslim Punk in an Alt-Right Era

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 3, Page 63-65, Summer 2017.
  7. Religiosity and Muslim Women’s Employment in the United States

    Does Muslim women’s religiosity deter them from paid work outside the home? I extend this question to Muslims in the United States, where the Muslim community is both ethnically and socioeconomically diverse and where this question has not yet been answered. I pool data from the 2007 and 2011 Pew Research Center surveys of American Muslims, the only large, nationally representative samples of Muslims in the United States, and use logistic regression models to analyze the relationship between religiosity and Muslim women’s employment.
  8. Producing Sacredness and Defending Secularity: Faith in the Workplace of Taiwanese Scientists

    Although a recent body of scholarship focuses on how business professionals infuse spiritual practices in their workplaces, comparatively little attention has been paid to faith in the scientific workplace, especially in an Eastern, non-Christian context. Between 2014 and 2015, we conducted a survey of 892 scientists in Taiwan and completed interviews with 52 of our survey respondents. In this paper, we examine how scientists navigate religion in the scientific workplace.
  9. Testing a Digital Inequality Model for Online Political Participation

    Increasing Internet use is changing the way individuals take part in society. However, a general mobilizing effect of the Internet on political participation has been difficult to demonstrate. This study takes a digital inequality perspective and analyzes the role of Internet expertise for the social structuration of online political participation. Analyses rely on two nationally representative surveys in Switzerland and use cluster analysis and structural equation modeling. A distinct group of political online participants emerged characterized by high education and income.
  10. Alternately Contested: A Measurement Analysis of Alternately Worded Items in the National Science Foundation Science Literacy Scale

    Alternately worded versions of two controversial indicators of science knowledge were included in the 2012 wave of the General Social Survey. Using confirmatory factor analysis, the author tests whether these alternate items serve as better indicators of uncontested forms of science knowledge and finds that although more respondents give the “correct” response, they remain poor indicators of uncontested science knowledge.