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  1. Review Essays: Making Money Matter

    Author of The Sociology of Money (1994), Nigel Dodd advances the current fascination with “media of exchange,” from his position at the London School of Economics, by wisely entering sustained dialogue with Marx and Simmel, as well as with many lesser lights from more recent times. This finely produced volume sports all the appurtenances nowadays expected of the serious monograph: comprehensive scope in digestible prose, plentiful footnotes, endless citations to, and dialogue with, other scholars’ works, and a splendid bibliography in reduced font (pp. 395–420).
  2. How Environmental Decline Restructures Indigenous Gender Practices: What Happens to Karuk Masculinity When There Are No Fish?

    On the Klamath River in northern California, Karuk tribal fishermen traditionally provide salmon for food and ceremonies, yet the region has sustained serious environmental degradation in recent years. What happens to Karuk masculinity when there are no fish? Using interviews and public testimony, the authors examine how declining salmon runs affect the gender identities and practices of Karuk fishermen. Gendered practices associated with fishing serve ecological functions, perpetuate culture in the face of structural genocide, and unite families and communities.
  3. Estimating Moderated Causal Effects with Time-varying Treatments and Time-varying Moderators: Structural Nested Mean Models and Regression with Residuals

    Individuals differ in how they respond to a particular treatment or exposure, and social scientists are often interested in understanding how treatment effects are moderated by observed characteristics of individuals. Effect moderation occurs when individual covariates dampen or amplify the effect of some exposure. This article focuses on estimating moderated causal effects in longitudinal settings in which both the treatment and effect moderator vary over time.
  4. Ideology and Threat Assessment: Law Enforcement Evaluation of Muslim and Right-Wing Extremism

    Does ideology affect assessment of the threat of violent extremism? A survey of law enforcement agencies in the United States in 2014 offers a comparison suggesting a small but statistically significant effect: Political attitudes were correlated with assessment of threats posed by Muslim extremists, and threat assessment was not correlated with the number of Muslim Americans who had engaged in violent extremism within the agency’s jurisdiction.
  5. Scorn Wars: Rural White People and Us

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 58-62, Winter 2016.
  6. Climate Misinformation Campaigns and Public Sociology

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 78-79, Winter 2016.
  7. Review Essays: The Elusive Recovery: Post-Hurricane Katrina Rebuilding During the First Decade, 2005–2015

    Review Essays: The Elusive Recovery: Post-Hurricane Katrina Rebuilding During the First Decade, 2005–2015
  8. Beyond Health Effects? Examining the Social Consequences of Community Levels of Uninsurance Pre-ACA

    The lack of health insurance is traditionally considered a problem faced by individuals and their families. However, because of the geographically bounded organization and funding of healthcare in the United States, levels of uninsurance in a community may affect everyone living there. Health economists have examined how the effects of uninsurance spillover from the uninsured to the insured, negatively affecting healthcare access and quality for the insured.
  9. Review Essays: Wanted: More Climate Change in Sociology; More Sociology in Climate Change (Policy)

    Publication of three major volumes on the sociology of climate change in 2015 is an indication of the rise of its prominence within sociology.
  10. Portland Oregon, Music Scenes, and Change: A Cultural Approach to Collective Strategies of Empowerment

    This article highlights the role of the independent music culture of Portland, Oregon, in establishing a productive culture of consumption and spaces that contribute to the place character of the city. Derived from an ethnographic research project of urban culture and social change in Portland, Oregon, guided interviews and extended participant observation helped to bring to light the cultural economy that artists and musicians make for the city.