American Sociological Association

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  1. Gimme Shelter

    Stacy Torres on an overlooked variable in birth rates: housing shortages.

  2. Be a Good Neighbor! Mind (Y)Our Business

    Emily Walton on neighborhood norms and whose business is our business.

  3. Hurricane Flooding and Environmental Inequality: Do Disadvantaged Neighborhoods Have Lower Elevations?

    Most research on environmental inequality studies whether poor and minority neighborhoods are more exposed to environmental hazards in the form of pollution and waste. However, natural disasters, such as hurricanes, and their aftermaths are also important forms of environmental hazards and may disproportionally affect disadvantaged neighborhoods. Using data from Google Maps API and the American Community Survey, this study shows that poor neighborhoods in the Houston area tend to have lower elevations and thus may be more vulnerable to flooding.
  4. Featured Essay: Why Sociologists Matter in the Welfare Reform Debate

    In the 1960s, public support for Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), a federal program that provided cash benefits to eligible poor families with children, began to erode (Teles 1996). Critics of welfare associated the growing number of unwed mothers with the rising rates of AFDC, even though the scientific evidence offered scant support for this claim.
  5. Community and the Crime Decline: The Causal Effect of Local Nonprofits on Violent Crime

    Largely overlooked in the theoretical and empirical literature on the crime decline is a long tradition of research in criminology and urban sociology that considers how violence is regulated through informal sources of social control arising from residents and organizations internal to communities. In this article, we incorporate the “systemic” model of community life into debates on the U.S. crime drop, and we focus on the role that local nonprofit organizations played in the national decline of violence from the 1990s to the 2010s.
  6. Advantaged/Disadvantaged School Neighborhoods, Parental Networks, and Parental Involvement at Elementary School

    This article examines the relationship between parental networks and parental school involvement during the elementary school years. Using a large, nationally representative data set of elementary school students—the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Kindergarten Cohort—and contextual data from the 2000 U.S. Census, our multilevel analysis shows that higher levels of parental networks in first grade are associated with higher levels of parental school involvement in third grade after controlling for individual- and school-level characteristics.
  7. Three Types of Neighborhood Reactions to Local Immigration and New Refugee Settlements

    Neighborhoods can potentially be mediators of inclusion (but also of exclusion) of immigrants if they host institutions that might foster social encounters across different social groups. This can be realized, for example, by means of community centers, schools, or public libraries, or by allowing everyday social encounters, such as in public spaces. But it is not only in the United States that public discussions on immigration and its impact on local neighborhoods are viewed in many cases negatively and with fear of “the great unknown” (Bauman 2016, p. 106).

  8. Older People's Self-Selected Spaces of Encounter in Urban Aging Environments in the Netherlands

    Using a narrative methodology involving 216 older people in six urban aging environments in the Netherlands, we examined how they use and experience (semi-)public spaces as spaces of encounter, and the meanings they derive from using and experiencing these spaces. The research shows that, first, older people prefer commercial spaces like shopping malls to planned and designed activity spaces in care homes or neighborhood centers. Second, older people struggle with the transformations that have taken place in urban social life since they were young adults.

  9. Moving Out: Mapping Mobile Home Park Closures to Analyze Spatial Patterns of Low-Income Residential Displacement

    Mobile homes provide the largest source of unsubsidized affordable housing in the United States. However, in mobile home parks residents live at risk of eviction because they rent the land on which their homes are located. This study formulates a methodology to examine the residential turnover and displacement that result from the closure of these parks. I investigate the spatial distribution of closing mobile home parks through ArcGIS modeling of land-use data for all 1.2 million parcels in the case study region of Houston/Harris County, Texas, from 2002 to 2011.

  10. Neighborhood Effects on Immigrants’ Experiences of Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Distress

    The neighborhood context is considered a key institution of inequality influencing individuals’ exposure and psychological vulnerability to stressors in the work-family interface, including work-family conflict (WFC). However, experiences of neighborhood context, WFC, and its mental health consequences among minority populations—including foreign-born residents—remain unexplored. We address this limitation and draw on tenants of the stress process model to unpack our hypotheses. We further test whether our focal associations vary for mothers and fathers.