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  1. What Is Racial Residential Integration? A Research Synthesis, 1950-2013

    In the past two decades, there has been a sharp increase in the number of studies on racial residential integration. However, there is a fair amount of disagreement in this work about how to conceptualize integration and how to operationalize it in research. We conduct a research synthesis of published research from 1950 to 2013 to uncover (1) how scholars have defined integration, (2) how scholars have measured integration, and (3) which ethnic/racial groups are integrating with whom. We have three key findings.

  2. LGBT Populations in Studies of Urban Neighborhoods: Making the Invisible Visible

    LGBT Populations in Studies of Urban Neighborhoods: Making the Invisible Visible

  3. Review Essays: Human Agency and the Search for Security in the Global Age

    Maria Aysa-Lastra reviews Making a Life in Multiethnic Miami: Immigration and the Rise of a Global City, by Elizabeth M. Aranda, Sallie Hughes, and Elena Sabogal.

  4. Poverty Attributions and the Perceived Justice of Income Inequality: A Comparison of East and West Germany

    Though the concept of social justice is widely used in the social sciences, we know little about the amount of income inequality that is perceived as just and why perceptions vary across social contexts. In this paper, we argue the ways people define the causes of poverty are related to how they perceive and justify existing income inequality. We examine internal and external attributions of poverty using survey data from the 2006 International Social Justice Project (ISJP). We compare two culturally and structurally distinct regions—East and West Germany.

  5. Prejudice, Exclusion, and Economic Disadvantage: A Theory

    A central hypothesis about discrimination is that prejudice forces the stigmatized into low-paying, undesirable jobs. Prejudice clearly leads to exclusion. But surprisingly, evidence linking exclusion to disadvantage is mixed. We address this issue theoretically, providing a formal rational choice model combining arguments from sociology (on prejudice) and economics (on competition). Our theory suggests that economic organization is crucial.

  6. The Onset of Ethnic War: A General Theory

    This article develops a general theory regarding the onset of ethnic war, starting with two analytic innovations: a mechanism-based approach toward social facts and an emphasis on dynamic interactions. I deploy two meta-mechanisms – the security dilemma/spiral model and intergroup-intragroup interactions – as meta-synthesizers. I then bring together the numerous factors and mechanisms scattered in the literature into a more integrative and dynamic theory of ethnic war by linking factors with immediate drivers of conflictual behavior via the two meta-mechanisms.

  7. A Paper Ceiling: Explaining the Persistent Underrepresentation of Women in Printed News

    In the early twenty-first century, women continue to receive substantially less media coverage than men, despite women’s much increased participation in public life. Media scholars argue that actors in news organizations skew news coverage in favor of men and male-related topics. However, no previous study has systematically examined whether such media bias exists beyond gender ratio imbalances in coverage that merely mirror societal-level structural and occupational gender inequalities.

  8. Decomposition of Gender or Racial Inequality with Endogenous Intervening Covariates: An Extension of the DiNardo-Fortin-Lemieux Method

    This paper begins by clarifying that propensity-score weighting in the DiNardo-Fortin-Lemieux (DFL) decomposition analysis—unlike propensity-score weighting in Rubin’s causal model, in which confounding covariates can be endogenous—may generate biased estimates for the decomposition of inequality into "direct" and "indirect" components when intervening variables are endogenous.

  9. Being Straight in a Post-Closeted Culture

    Heterosexuals’ new freedoms and anxieties.

  10. Toward a New Macro-Segregation? Decomposing Segregation within and between Metropolitan Cities and Suburbs

    This article documents a new macro-segregation, where the locus of racial differentiation resides increasingly in socio-spatial processes at the community or place level. The goal is to broaden the spatial lens for studying segregation, using decennial Census data on 222 metropolitan areas. Unlike previous neighborhood studies of racial change, we decompose metropolitan segregation into its within- and between-place components from 1990 to 2010. This is accomplished with the Theil index (H). Our decomposition of H reveals large post-1990 declines in metropolitan segregation.