American Sociological Association

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  1. What happened to the “War on Women?”

    Deana A. Rohlinger contrasts the war on women with the war for women–or at least their votes.

  2. Carrying Guns, Contesting Gender

    http://ctx.sagepub.com/content/14/1/20.abstract

  3. Mixed Messages about Teen Sex

    In the U.S., young people are having less sex than the generations that came before, while the advice they get from peers, teachers, and parents becomes ever more scattered.

  4. Settler Colonialism as Structure: A Framework for Comparative Studies of U.S. Race and Gender Formation

    Understanding settler colonialism as an ongoing structure rather than a past historical event serves as the basis for an historically grounded and inclusive analysis of U.S. race and gender formation. The settler goal of seizing and establishing property rights over land and resources required the removal of indigenes, which was accomplished by various forms of direct and indirect violence, including militarized genocide.

  5. Lgbttsqqiaa…

    Melissa M. Wilcox provides a historical overview of the development of self-chosen terminology among same-sex attracted and gender-nonconforming people in the twentieth and twenty-first century, particularly in Western Anglophone cultures. She explains why certain terms are preferred over others, as well as when and why the preferred terms have changed.

  6. Community Disorder, Victimization Exposure, and Mental Health in a National Sample of Youth

    This study considers whether elevated distress among youth living in more disordered neighborhoods can be explained by personal exposure to violence and victimization, level of non-victimization adversity, and family support. Analyses were based on a sample of 2,039 youth ages 10 to 17 who participated in the National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence, a national telephone survey conducted in 2008.

  7. Stigma Allure and White Antiracist Identity Management

    This article examines how “white antiracists” manage a perceived, and sometimes self-imposed, stigma. Given that whiteness and antiracism are often framed as antonyms, white engagement with matters commonly deemed “nonwhite issues” often involves a presentation of self that unsettles established habit and expected modes of interaction. Adding to the research on race and stigma, I demonstrate how privileged actors repeatedly construct a broken and stigmatized white and antiracist identity in which management of one recreates the stigmatization of the other.

  8. Becoming Black Women: Intimate Stories and Intersectional Identities

    In this article, I argue that intimate stories are an important resource for the achievement of intersectional identities. Drawing on in-depth interviews with black college students at two predominantly white universities, I examine the stories black college women tell about interracial relationships between black men and white women. I argue that interracial stories serve an array of social purposes that go well beyond black women’s intimate lives themselves.

  9. Men in Caring Occupations: Doing Gender Differently

    As there is less written about men in occupations where the majority of workers are women than the reverse, I was looking forward to reading Men in Caring Occupations, especially regarding the four occupations covered—airplane cabin crew, nurses, primary school teachers, and librarians. The focus of the book is how men “negotiate the potential mismatch between the (feminine) nature of the job and a gendered (masculine) identity” (p. 4-5). As the minority group in these occupations, men need to practice their caring skills, but need not feminize as workers.